My Networker Login   |   
feed-60facebook-60twitter-60linkedin-60youtube-60
 

Daily Subscribe5

MOST READ ARTICLES

MAGAZINE COMMENTS

 20140929.psychotherapy networker online 1014

AmericanProfessionalAgency300x250

 Renfrew Conference

2014.10.NewHarbinger

MN ad

Friday, 26 December 2008 13:08

From Research to Practice

Written by 
Rate this item
(0 votes)

 

 

From Research to Practice: Scoreboard for Couples Therapies

Which are the Winners in the Latest Research?

by Jay Lebow

Couples therapy is on a roll. Whereas a mere 20 years ago, surveys showed that consumers didn't think much of it, today it's become increasingly accepted by the general public. Indeed, to end a marriage without benefit of some sort of marital therapy or counseling is now widely viewed as somehow irresponsible--as if the couple were remiss for not making that last-ditch effort to put themselves back together again. And whereas, two decades ago, the most prominent models of therapy focused almost exclusively on individual work, today as many as 70 percent of therapists here and abroad treat couples as part of their practices, according to a study conducted by prominent psychotherapy researcher David Orlinsky of the University of Chicago and his colleagues around the world.

Yet the research about couples therapy, as well as research about couples themselves--why some marriages succeed and others don't--hasn't kept pace with the growth of couples therapy. The slow pace of research on couples is partly due to the fact that relational distress isn't considered a "mental disorder" by DSM-IV, and thus doesn't usually qualify for government funding. In addition, researchers and clinicians have only recently recognized how important couples therapy can be in the treatment of such individual mental health problems as depression and anxiety. Even now, those researching the behavior of couples and couples therapy treatments have been limited to a small group of investigators dedicated enough to continue their work despite sporadic funding.

In spite of these handicaps, a considerable body of information has emerged that tells us a great deal about what works and doesn't work, both in couples' relationships and in couples therapy. The two strands of research inform each other: learning the specific differences between the ways couples interact in satisfying and unsatisfying relationships serves to pinpoint helpful behavioral, cognitive, and affective skills that therapists can encourage in their clinical work.

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next > End >>
(Page 1 of 8)
Last modified on Friday, 26 December 2008 15:37

Leave a comment (existing users please login first)