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Depathologizing The Borderline Client

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  • Comment Link Monday, 10 June 2013 16:23 posted by Kimberly April (not my real name)

    Thank you for humanizing the reality of the results of adult survivors of childhood abuse, and for specific ways to help therapists effectively relate to, treat, and heal those affected by this senseless horror. I am a survivor, and yes, I saw parts of myself in your dialogue. I am almost finished with my therapeutic journey of 4 long and sometimes painful years, yet also colored by unequivocal joy encontered through the ability to finally feel and deeply connect to another human being, my therapist. I appreciate all of your research and practical steps with parts work designed to help heal a shattered self. Doing parts work was one of the most painful yet healing parts of therapy after the much feared phase of establishing safety and trust, which took a very long time, and was filled with a lot of acting out in many forms.
    Thanks again for this article and your work which has given those of us who have survived destructive secrets of the past much hope for unibiased treatment and point us to a live worth living, full of connecting with others. I am not out of the woods yet as the termination part of therapy seems to be a difficult one full of loss and pain, because although I intellectually realize that my therapist is not my father, all my little girl wants to do is take her blankie and climb up on the couch and sit next to him, because he helped me feel safe and finally alive. (This definitely is embarrassing for me because I am older than he is, and part of the baby boomer generation.)I am sure I will get through this because my therapist has given me coping skills, and I know he will walk with me to show me the way. Although he will not walk for me, he will walk with me, and that for me makes all the difference!

  • Comment Link Monday, 20 May 2013 18:22 posted by toni aguilar

    this article has excellent advice for the therapist whose "parts" get too reactive and take things personally. (one of my clients taught me the term "QTIP"--quit taking it personally.) the rage (coming at us or simply to us)that some of these clients can exhibit is very difficult for some of us to handle w/o getting weary, no matter how compassionate or skilled we are. i DO believe in and use the idea of internal family systems, and i teach all my clients that all human behavior is purposive, geared toward whatever the subconscious THINKS it needs for survival. so i try to hang onto curiosity and that compassion at my core....but whew! i find it to be very hard work sometimes, choosing just the right words, the right tone, the right demeanor to help those protectors accept all of us who are in the room! thanks for running the article.

  • Comment Link Saturday, 18 May 2013 22:02 posted by Gary Brown

    though I am not a therapist, nor a phsychologist or anything like that, I have been reading and enjoying this magazine for five or six years. I found this article to be very interesting and if I might dare to say, insightful. I talk with a lot of people and many of them ask me questions similar to those a therapist might receive.
    I like to relate back to different articles I have read in this magazine to suggest things to those people. Many times I find that those to whom I speak find the way we interact to be thoughtful and insightful, I suspect this article will lead to further insights I might be able to share with those who ask for my input.
    Thank you for the article, I feel it was a very worthwhile read.

  • Comment Link Wednesday, 15 May 2013 16:14 posted by Suzanne Watts

    As a therapist treating survivors of sexual abuse, this article was very informative for me. Therapists can be very nervous about treating clients who have been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder, especially if they are described and identified with that label. Viewing these clients as trauma survivors enables therapists to reframe their own countertransference reactions and possibly see the clients in a different light, as you so elequently pointed out.

    However, as the article concluded it appeared as though you might have been referencing a client with Dissociative Identity Disorder (Colette in your article). It is difficult to tell given the brief summary of your interactions. I found that internal family systems therapy is very effective in treating DID and am interested in learning more about it.

    In any event, all trauma therapists can benefit from helping clients speak to their inner "parts" which may have opposing messages at first glance.

    Thank you for the informative article!

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