Author Archives: Psychotherapy Networker

Treating the Anxious Client

By Rich Simon Back in the 1970s, as boomers like me came out of grad school and flooded the psychotherapy field, the big challenge to the mainstream tradition of psychodynamic orthodoxy was posed by the iconoclastic family therapists like Salvador Minuchin, Virginia Satir, and Carl Whitaker. Their version of therapy seemed like a thrill-a-minute joyride in comparison to the staid predictability of therapy-as-usual. Read more

Eugene Gendlin Describes The “Felt Sense”

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Robert Hedaya on the Physical Factors that Can Affect Mental Health

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Diana Fosha Shares An Example From Her Own Work

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Reading Emotions

By Jared DeFife

When it comes to the craft of conversation, most of us believe that some face-to-face interaction is the key component of emotional communication. For social engagement, we connect with our social network over Facebook or use our various iDevices for a little FaceTime with relatives. But new research is questioning how we actually process and interpret the emotional reactions of others. The findings might make us take an about-face turn on conventional wisdom regarding facial expressions and emotions.

For decades, researchers have relied on the “Ekman faces” for studying how we process emotional expressions. In the 1970s, psychologist Paul Ekman created a set of black and white photographic images of actors portraying six “universal emotions”: happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, fear, and surprise. Although the stimuli have varied over time (to incorporate actors of varying ethnicity, for example) and the universal emotions have expanded (to include emotions such as pride, guilt, and shame), the fundamental reliance on facial expressions as a primary indicator of emotional state has remained. Now it appears that, when it comes to intense real-world emotional experiences—such as the joy and relief of seeing your first child born or the agony and disappointment of a crushing defeat—our faces may not be as revealing as once believed.

To examine the role of facial expressions and body language in how we interpret the intense emotional displays of others, researchers at Princeton, New York, and Radboud universities captured photographic images of peak emotional expressions from a variety of powerful real-life situations, including high-stakes tennis matches, sexual orgasms, home-makeover reveals, and navel or nipple piercing. After manipulating the images to isolate facial expressions, bodily expressions, or bodily and facial expressions combined, the researchers asked study participants to rate the type and intensity of emotional experience they thought they saw in each image.

As published in the journal Science, the results demonstrated that when viewing facial expressions alone, viewers were no better than chance at identifying whether the expression indicated a positive or negative experience. Viewers were much better able to identify positive or negative experiences when viewing the images of bodily expressions of emotions (with or without the corresponding facial display).

In case you’re tempted to read these results and think you knew it would turn out that way all along, the researchers actually described their methods to a separate group of participants beforehand. Of those asked, 80 percent thought viewing the face alone would be most accurate, whereas only 20 percent thought the body/face images would be most effective, and zero people predicted that the body image alone would be the most useful indicator. Furthermore, by manipulating the body image, the experimenters successfully manipulated viewer perceptions of the emotions shown. For example, when putting the face of someone undergoing piercing on the body of a tennis victor, viewers were more likely to rate the photograph as someone experiencing intense joy.

“These results show that when emotions become extremely intense, the difference between positive and negative facial expression blurs,” said the lead researcher Hillel Aviezer in a released statement. “From a practical-clinical perspective, the results may help researchers understand how body/face expressions interact during emotional situations. For example, individuals with autism may fail to recognize facial expressions, but perhaps if trained to process important body cues, their performance may significantly improve.”

Beyond that, the study’s results may have implications for therapist practice and training by overcoming our natural inclination to pay attention to facial expressions and highlighting more focused attention on body language and physical cues. Videotaped supervision sessions might need to zoom back to incorporate the body posture of therapists and their patients. Also, teletherapy through Skype, which focuses primarily on the face, might be improved with more attention to the whole-person image.

Resources

Reading Emotions: Science 338, no. 6111 (November 2012): 1225–29; http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-11/thuo-bln112912.php.

John Preston On The Importance Of Addressing Underlying Issues.

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Daniel Kahneman On Why We’re So Confident Even When We’re Wrong.

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Using A Short-Term Safety Net For Long-Term Effective Healing.

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Rich Simon

By Rich Simon I’m only just now coming down into the real world from post-Symposium euphoria—a powerful, but mostly benign, emotional disorder that temporarily interferes with logical thought that reaches epidemic proportions in our offices after our annual conference each spring. But, as I recapture some of my cognitive facilities, it does occur to me that for many of us, coming to a vitalizing communal experience like the Networker Symposium induces a pronounced state of altered consciousness. Read more

With this webcast session we ask ourselves how do we recognize, and share with our clients, the “Wisdom” we have gained. Join Ron Siegel as we discuss how to lay the groundwork of transformation to activate our overall awareness.

Learn how to bring freshness and novelty to your life and practice by moving beyond habitual patterns. Join Eugene Gendlin as he shows how to use our “Felt Sense.”

Today we’re becoming even more disconnected from one another. Join Tara Brach as she takes us through practices that can help you and your client move beyond the individual identity toward the fuller realization that we are all part of a larger whole.

Discover how writing fiction can evoke a personal narrative from clients, which lays at the heart of the therapeutic process. Join Irvin Yalom as he explores the meaning of authenticity in psychotherapy and art and how that wisdom can enhance your own authenticity with clients.

Do you or your client want to lead lives that are more joyous, connected, and empowered? Join Mary Pipher as she helps therapists discover how to face challenges and open up to the wider world without being overwhelmed.

Do you or your client need insight into the process of choice and judgement? Join Daniel Kahneman as he provides groundbreaking insight and helps therapists recognize the role of systematic biases in human cognition.

After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.