Author Archives: Psychotherapy Networker

How Brain Science Illuminates Gender Differences

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Susan Johnson on Why Labeling Clients’ Emotions Isn’t Enough

Emotions can be tricky—once they enter the consulting room, it’s easy for both therapists and clients to become stuck in, overwhelmed by, and embattled with strong emotions. It’s no surprise that so many models of therapy focus on changing clients’ problematic thoughts and behaviors—their unhealthy habits, outbursts, and destructive self-talk—while emotions take a back seat. When clients’ emotions are addressed in these cognition-focused models of therapy, they’re labeled and acknowledged without becoming central to the therapeutic process.

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Tell Us What You Think | Ask Questions | Get Feedback From Your Peers

David Mays reviews the latest research and how it will shape the future of psychotherapy.

Did David Mays make his case successfully? Were there any developments Mays discussed that you think will be of great importance in the future of psychotherapy? Are there developments you don’t think will have as much importance as Mays implied? Will what you learned about suicide risk assessment change the way you assess and diagnose clients? How will what you learned change the way you practice both today and in the future?

If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

Tell Us What You Think | Ask Questions | Get Feedback From Your Peers

Gary Greenberg discusses the DSM and analyzes the major issues surrounding the new DSM-5.

Did Gary Greenberg successfully explain the history of the DSM and the controversies surrounding DSM-5?  Did Greenberg offer helpful information regarding what therapists can do about our diagnostic system? How will what you learned change the way you practice?

If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

Gary Greenberg On The Bereavement Exclusion

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Rich SimonIt’s a cliché phrase by now, uttered by every health professional at some early point in their careers, but I became a psychotherapist because I wanted to help people. Why else do any of us do it? For many of us, being able to provide support and guidance to people who are moving through the darkest periods in their lives is what keeps us returning to our offices to sit with even the most difficult clients. Read more

Ron Taffel on What Families Can’t Function Without.

The days of children being seen and not heard are long gone–a change that’s welcome in most modern families. Now, however, kids and teens are increasingly expressing themselves through extensive online social networks, which open them up to new spheres of influence that challenge parental authority in an unprecedented way.  

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DSM-5: NP0043 – Session 4

Jack Klott claims DSM-5 will help in the treatment of anxiety, depressive, bipolar, and personality disorders; substance use, addictions, trauma, and stress-related disorders; and suicidal or self-mutilating clients.

Did Jack Klott make his case successfully to you? Will what you learned today change how you treat your clients? Has DSM-5 already changed the way you assess and diagnose? How will what you learned change the way you practice?

If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

Tell Us What You Think | Ask Questions | Get Feedback From Your Peers

Did one or more presenters really move you? Do you have questions about content? How will what you learned change the way you practice? Is there a particular technique you plan to try? Ask your colleagues about their experiences treating resistant men in therapy or couples therapy.

Join the conversation!

If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

Jack Klott On The One Major Flaw He Finds In DSM-5

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