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Brain Integration as the Key to Mental Health

Dan Siegel Defines the Attributes of a H ...

Our Bottom Line Responsibility as Therapists

Rick Hanson on Working with the Brain fo ...

Helping Kids Find the Answers Inside

Charlotte Reznick on tapping into Imagin ...


  • kateposey on Brain Science I'm glad Siegel points out the mind brain duality, but his definition of mind (regulation of information and energy flow)is ...
  • lynnlampert on NP0047: Revitalize Your Practice Joe mentioned the importance of title tag but never defined what it was. Can we get more info on this. Lynn
  • katharyn on NP0047: Revitalize Your Practice I am so glad I decided to opt for this series. I was reticent as it seems "everyone" has ...
  • Lisa_703 on Emotion Thank you for putting together this panel, Rich. Very valuable. One critique that may improve on these interviews ...
  • kmartin89 on Tough Customers Loved Mitchell piece on resistance. Some great tools for my tool box; I loved the part about getting out of ...

How Meeting Condition Criteria Doesn’t Equal Mental Disorder

Jack Klott on One of the Diagnostic Changes in DSM-5

While the publication of DSM-5 came with many surprises, few were as shocking—or as controversial—as the number of changes made to diagnosis specifiers. These changes affect how a whole host of clients will be diagnosed and treated, including clients who have been living with a specific diagnosis for years.

In this clip from our Networker Webcast series The Uproar Over DSM-5, Jack Klott walks us through the specific example of dysthymia—a depressive disorder—explaining how, according to DSM-5, a client can meet all the criteria for this condition, but still not qualify for a mental disorder.

The Uproar Over DSM-5:
How The New Standards Affect Your Practice

Get course details here.

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