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WEBCAST HIGHLIGHTS

Engaging Kids who Hate Therapy

How to Talk to Kids in a Way They Unders ...

Using Empathy to Help Kids Self-regulate

How Being Calm and Collected Gets Us Con ...

Lighting the Spark in Teen Clients

Ron Taffel on Creating Conditions for Co ...

WEBCAST COMMENTS

  • Phil West on Lighting the Spark in Teen Clients Although I don't work with teens at this time (yet? :)) this little clip came at the right time. It ...
  • lesliesevelo@gmail.com on Tough Customers It strikes me that this sort of "radical empathy," if you will, is rather like the mindfulness approach of noticing ...
  • Liz Ann Clemens on Defusing Male Shame On my trip home none of the elders never uttered words of shame but merely watched me stoically. And, when ...
  • Daryl Clemens on Defusing Male Shame While I generally agree with the proposition that shame is detrimental in the consulting room, I have always been impressed ...
  • Suzanne M on Defusing Male Shame I am curious.Is you client from Mexico,of Mexican decent, US born or has he immigrated legally/illegally? Is "Mexican" how your ...

Diagnosing More Dimensionally with DSM-5

Darrel Regier on How DSM-5 Allows for Better Client Characterizations

As therapists, we’re well aware that our clients in psychological distress rarely—if ever—fit neatly into the strict confines of DSM disorders. Despite this, the economic realities of managed care and the underlying usefulness of a diagnostic framework have deepened our reliance on the DSM system, including the highly criticized DSM-5.

Darrel Regier—vice chair of the DSM-5 Task Force—argues that the DSM-5 is actually more equipped than previous versions to reflect the many dimensions of clients’ presenting problems. A prime example of this is the reworking of major depressive disorder.

In this clip from his session in our Networker Webcast series The Uproar Over DSM-5, Darrel talks about how major depressive disorder was defined in the past, and how a new specifier in DSM-5 will allow clinicians to better characterize clients who exhibit symptoms for both depression and anxiety.

The Uproar Over DSM-5:
How The New Standards Affect Your Practice

Get course details here.

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