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The Art of Evoking Felt Experience

Courtney Armstrong on Using Positive Emotional Imagery to Counter Negative Beliefs


Most of us have been trained—at least in part—to appeal to the cognitive mind of our clients.

But, according to Courtney Armstrong— who trains mental health professionals in creative techniques for healing trauma—that’s taking the long way round. Why? Because most client issues are rooted in the emotional brain where memories and attachment schemas are stored, not the cognitive brain.

In this clip from her session, in our new webcast series, Creativity in the Consulting Room, Courtney walks us through an approach that taps directly into the emotional brain’s storehouse of powerful embodied memories. She calls this approach “Improvisational Imagery,” illustrating how and why it works with an example from her own clinical work.

Courtney Armstrong is one of the new generation of master clinicians who use creativity and innovation to get clients’ full attention, trigger their curiosity, and kindle their motivation for change. Learn more when you join Courtney Armstrong this Wednesday, March 5th at 1 pm for our new webcast series:

Creativity in the Consulting Room:
New Tools for More Energizing and Effective Therapy
Get full course detail here.

Here’s a preview of what each session in this series covers:

  • Stephen Gilligan on Evoking Creative States of Consciousness
    Master powerful methods for helping clients access the generative mind-body states that can enable them to realize their dreams.
  • Courtney Armstrong on Vitalizing Your Clinical Style
    Break free from one-size-fits-all approaches and discover how to bring more of your creative potential into your work.
  • Erving Polster on Making New Things Happen
    A celebrated therapist with more than 6 decades of clinical experience reflects on the lessons he’s learned about creativity in the consulting room.
  • Peggy Papp on Metaphor, Symbol, and Fantasy in Couples Therapy
    Learn how to use experiential techniques to transform therapeutic stalemates into transformational moments.
  • Steve Andreas on The Clinical Artistry of Virginia Satir
    Through the use of clinical videos, focus on understanding the powerful techniques that made Virginia Satir a legend in our field.
  • Jeffrey Zeig on Altering Consciousness Through the Arts
    Discover how to use methods drawn from the arts to helps clients shift rigid patterns of unhappy thoughts, emotions, and sensations.

Don’t Miss This Practice-Transforming Series.
Watch Sessions Weekly as They Air or On-Demand for a Full Year!
Sign up now

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