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Ron Taffel on Creating Conditions for Co ...

A New Way to Engage Teen Clients

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Understanding the Significance to Male C ...

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  • Liz Ann Clemens on Defusing Male Shame On my trip home none of the elders never uttered words of shame but merely watched me stoically. And, when ...
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  • Kristina Cizmar, The Shame Lady on Defusing Male Shame The problem is that defining shame as some version of "I am bad" fits right in with the globalized ...
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When Meds Don’t Work: A Troubleshooter’s Guide with Steven Dubovsky

Meds: Myths and Realities: NP0035 – Session 5

What do you do when medications are no longer working for your client? What factors lead you to this conclusion? Join Steven Dubovsky as he explores these issues and helps you to create tools you can use in your practice.

After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

Posted in CE Comments, NP0035: Meds: Myths and Realities | Tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to When Meds Don’t Work: A Troubleshooter’s Guide with Steven Dubovsky

  1. marescho says:

    I liked this talk. It helped make sense of the inconsistent clinical findings of many studies.
    Seeing the number of clients who did not fit and how studies were constructed was illuminating. I also liked that his goal was to make the patient well or close to well, tied to real life functioning, rather than better than before, but still very impaired.

  2. andrewws says:

    Fantastic!

  3. Khegberg says:

    Really, really helpful and refreshing. I liked goal of wellness, and the take-away “keep trying.” I understand the amount of experimenting that goes in to medicating and treating, and it is easy to get discouraged both as a client and a clinician when relief does not come within a few sessions. A cultural expectation. This talk was very enlightening and supportive towards the effort.

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