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NP0036: Six Faces of Wisdom: Pathways to Becoming a Better Therapist

With this webcast session we ask ourselves how do we recognize, and share with our clients, the “Wisdom” we have gained. Join Ron Siegel as we discuss how to lay the groundwork of transformation to activate our overall awareness.

Learn how to bring freshness and novelty to your life and practice by moving beyond habitual patterns. Join Eugene Gendlin as he shows how to use our “Felt Sense.”

Today we’re becoming even more disconnected from one another. Join Tara Brach as she takes us through practices that can help you and your client move beyond the individual identity toward the fuller realization that we are all part of a larger whole.

Discover how writing fiction can evoke a personal narrative from clients, which lays at the heart of the therapeutic process. Join Irvin Yalom as he explores the meaning of authenticity in psychotherapy and art and how that wisdom can enhance your own authenticity with clients.

Do you or your client want to lead lives that are more joyous, connected, and empowered? Join Mary Pipher as she helps therapists discover how to face challenges and open up to the wider world without being overwhelmed.

Do you or your client need insight into the process of choice and judgement? Join Daniel Kahneman as he provides groundbreaking insight and helps therapists recognize the role of systematic biases in human cognition.

After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

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7 Responses to NP0036: Six Faces of Wisdom: Pathways to Becoming a Better Therapist

  1. Hennie says:

    Great start to the series. I like the interview format and I look forward to more.

  2. suewill says:

    As a therapist, I really appreciated the reminder that I may often succumb to my own neurobiology and reactive thinking as I respond to a client’s story and affect. This reminder was important in that it helps me to remember that I have the ability to breathe, relax, and simple be aware in those moments and that when I practice mindfulness (in those times), I increase my capacity to stay connected to my client. When I stay present and connected the relationship has a greater potential to work its magic in the session.

    Thanks again for this reminder!
    Cheers,
    Susan

  3. mgibson says:

    I feel very grateful for this presentation. I’ve heard Dr. Siegel in person and in several webinars, and I am continually learning from what he has to offer. What a great gift to us all, that Dr. Siegel can admit to “foolishness” and go on to describe some of the things that therapists do in sessions that might seem wise to us at first, but on reflection are actually springing from something other than wisdom. “Foolishness” is such a GREAT term–Dr. Siegel’s use of it is itself wise, as it shows a capacity for being mindful of what one does and at the same time practicing self-compassion for what is at base very human behavior. People EXPECT therapists to be wise, and you know we don’t like to disappoint. How to practice wisdom and self-awareness while maintaining attention on the CLIENT’s needs is a balancing act that may be one of the skills that a therapist gains over time.
    Thank you, Dr. Siegel, for being wise and human. And sincere thanks for the many resources offered at the end of the session.

  4. mgibson says:

    I feel very grateful for this presentation. I’ve heard Dr. Siegel in person and in several webinars, and I am continually learning from what he has to offer. What a great gift to us all, that Dr. Siegel can admit to “foolishness” and go on to describe some of the things that therapists do in sessions that might seem wise to us at first, but on reflection are actually springing from something other than wisdom. “Foolishness” is such a GREAT term–Dr. Siegel’s use of it is itself wise, as it shows a capacity for being mindful of what one does and at the same time practicing self-compassion for what is at base very human behavior. People EXPECT therapists to be wise, and you know we don’t like to disappoint. How to practice wisdom and self-awareness while maintaining attention on the CLIENT’s needs is a balancing act that may be one of the skills that a therapist gains over time.
    Thank you, Dr. Siegel, for being wise and human. And sincere thanks for the many resources offered at the end of the session.

  5. Nancy Gewirtz says:

    I have such gratitude that there is a Mary Pipher in this world helping us to love and care for our planet – and each other. . Exploring the mental health aspects of coping with frightening global change was so enlightening and empowering – both as a therapist and as a human being. The focus on resilient coping is so critical in both the therapy and the activism worlds. As a mother of two budding environmental activists, “The Green Boat” is a must read to nurture their spirit and hope. So , in a word, “Thank You” for this uplifting webinar!

  6. lynnlidbury says:

    In regards to Eugene Gendlin, it was good to hear from him personally about the process. My mentor, Evadne McNeil, develop an expressive arts process that paralleled his work and hearing him again shows me how much of what he says is ingrain in what I do as a therapist. I used Dan Siegel’s work, EMDR, Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy and the essence of how I use them is to attend in the way that Eugene expresses. I am very interested in the movement forward as creativity and a process to trust to bring us to Spirit. That is what Evadne would have said in her Atira process. The body sense in my is being noticed and followed towards a deeper understanding for myself. It feels like coming home again.

  7. bakedrock says:

    very helpful, validating, and informative. Truly reminded me to stop making my lists of things to do while sitting with a client I have worked with for several years and she seems always stuck. Even though I have “skillfully” “strategically” “systemically” “solution focussedly” “cognitive-behaviorally” “mind-body integratively” attempted to assist her over the years of her continuing to be stubbornly stuck….or perhaps me resisting accepting her where she is. I do like her and I am sad at her limited life due to my limited skill. so thank you for alerting me to be more compassionately mindful with her.

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