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Tag: Emotion

Using Mindfulness to Accept Emotionality: Deepening the Moment with Diana Fosha

 

The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 6

Explore how to use mindfulness and meta-processing to help clients witness and accept, rather than avoid, their emotional processes. Learn from Diana Fosha, the developer of Accelerated Experiential-Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP) and director of the AEDP Institute, how to understand the role of mindfulness and meta-processing in helping clients accept their emotions, how to define "glimmers of growth" and the importance of growth with clients who have experienced trauma, and how to explain the significance of helping clients learn how to stay in the present moment.


If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

08.29.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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Healing the Angry Brain with Ron Potter-Efron

 

The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 5

Dealing with an angry client can be a frustrating roadblock in therapy. Learn from Ron Potter-Efron, author of Healing The Angry Brain, about different types of anger, how to assess coping strategies for your client, and how to use those powerful emotions to the benefit of both the therapist and client. After the session, please let us know what you think.

If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

08.22.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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Our Brain's Negativity Bias: Taking in the Good with Rick Hanson

 

The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 - Session 4

In this session, you'll learn why positive emotions are often an underutilized resource in treatment and why people are vulnerable to negative biases. With Rick Hanson, you'll explore the benefits of helping clients internalize positive emotions.


After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant. These comment boards will be a valuable way to share your thoughts, opinions, and questions throughout the series. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to contact support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

08.15.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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When Your Client Cries with Jay Efran

 

The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 3

Discover how the latest findings on the psychobiology of crying can help you harness a client’s tears in session to engage with, understand, and regulate their emotions. Professor of psychology Jay Efran, who coauthored a compelling article on the topic in our May/June 2012 issue, discusses the practical do’s and don’ts of what to do when your client cries. Read the article here.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant. These comment boards will be a valuable way to share your thoughts, opinions, and questions throughout the series. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to contact support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

08.08.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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Bringing the Felt Sense into Psychotherapy with Joan Klagsburn

 

The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 2

 

Learn how to use the Focusing method to help clients talk about from their feelings rather than about them. Joan Klagsbrun, who’s pioneered the field of the Focusing method, discusses how to deepen the client’s lived experience by forming an intimate connection with their inner knowing that hasn’t yet been formed into words or thoughts.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to contact support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

08.01.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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Harnessing the Power of Emotion with Susan Johnson

 

The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 1

Welcome to “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room.” In this series, leading innovators in the field will explore how therapists can work more deeply and usefully with emotions in the consulting room---our own and the clients’. Each session will uncover different methods and techniques you can use to better utilize emotion in session.

In this first session with Susan Johnson, one of the developers of Emotionally Focused Therapy, you’ll discover methods to work more experientially with volatile emotions in the consulting room by delving into the client’s deeper attachment issues. You’ll learn to help clients achieve a more profound and enduring level of healing without resorting to controlling or distancing a client’s potentially explosive emotions. You can take a look at her compelling article on the same topic in our May/June 2012 issue, "The Power of Emotion in Therapy" here.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant. These comment boards will be a valuable way to share your thoughts, opinions, and questions throughout the series. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to contact support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.



07.24.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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No Emotion Allowed Here—Therapist at Work!

 

The Emotional Revolution

As therapists, probably most of us know only too well the queasy, anxious feeling we had as young practitioners (maybe even still have) when faced with a highly emotional client, perhaps sobbing uncontrollably in the chair across from us. Trained to believe that our job is to help that person feel better, we want to do something or say something that will provide comfort and ease that pain. But all too often, there’s been almost nothing in our academic education and survey of clinical theories to help us feel at home with our clients’ emotions, much less our own. 

And what about sitting face Emotional clientto face in a room with someone in a state of transferential rage—yelling, pounding the chair, blaming us for his/her problem? And couples! No wonder so many couples therapists favor coaching clients in highly cognitive skills-building and problem-solving techniques. In one interview of our upcoming webcast series on emotion, Sue Johnson remembers many years ago watching a therapist basically scold couples who seemed to be getting too upset, even sending one partner out of the room to calm down. The title of that session must surely have been, “No emotion here, please—therapist at work!”

This fear of out-of-control emotions, even among therapists who are supposed to be comfortable with “strong affect,” as we hygienically call it, reflects an old Cartesian prejudice in Western society against the “lower,” messier emotions—primitive, animal-like passions rooted in the body. For many hundreds of years, we’ve preferred the more respectable, “higher” faculties of logic and reason, products of the thinking, rational mind. From the very beginning, psychotherapy models, of whatever stripe, have shared this cultural bias. Rather than welcome emotions into the consulting room, they’ve tended to regard excessive expressions of emotion as symptoms of something awry in the psyche. The clinical goal has often been to get all that raw stuff under control. Freud’s directive—“Where id was, there shall ego be”—has been the implicit watchword for one hundred years of psychotherapy practice.

But, lo and behold, over the past two or three decades—even just in the last 10 years—we’ve been witness to nothing less than a revolution in our knowledge and understanding of emotion. Neuroscience research, for example, has demonstrated beyond all doubt that emotion is itself the driving force of much of our mental life, including our precious reasoning faculties. “We’re not necessarily thinking machines,” says renowned neuroscientist Antonio Damasio, “but feeling machines that think.” Without the literally moving force of affect—e-motion —we’re like high-IQ slugs in a sense, not likely to go anywhere or do much of anything except munch on whatever nutrients fall in our path. Without emotion, we’d be like disabled computers, with no desire, love, sadness, fear, need, impatience, anger, frustration, enthusiasm—those experiential states that literally turn us on, make us go. Without emotion, the wiring may be in place, but the power has been disconnected.

Luckily, therapists are also beginning to catch up to the neuroscience in their growing recognition that working sensitively and skillfully with clients’ emotions is critical to clinical success. In our new Networker webcast series beginning July 18th, “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room,” I talk with 6 therapeutic innovators—Susan Johnson, Rick Hanson, Joan Klagsbrun, Jay Efran, Ron Potter-Efron, and Diana Fosha—about the latest developments in helping clients experience emotion as a coherent, vital, enlivening force in their relational lives.

But even more than that, this group of noted contributors to our field show us the importance of how navigating through the ebb and flow of emotion is at the heart of our therapeutic craft. As Damasio has written, “Most of what we construct as wisdom over time is the result of cultivating the knowledge about how our emotions behave and what we learn from them.” I hope you can join us as we explore that state of our current clinical wisdom about the role of emotion in effective psychotherapy.

Want to read more on emotion in the consulting room? Take a look at the May/June 2012 issue here to peruse articles from some of the field’s visionaries, including Susan Johnson.

The Emotion Revolution:
Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

Starts Wednesday, July 25th

Click here for full course details.

06.29.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Rich Simon
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