My Networker Login   |   
feed-60facebook-60twitter-60linkedin-60youtube-60
 

The Choreography of Healing with Hedy Schleifer

 

Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?: NP0022 – Session 2

How can therapists most effectively work with emotion in the consulting room—particularly when it comes to couples therapy? Learn with internationally known couples therapist Hedy Schleifer how to help create a nourishing connection between partners, define a role as therapist-as-guide, and much more. Schleifer, who’s pioneered the training of Imago Relationship therapists internationally, will go into how to use this theory in practice and how to best work with emotions.  

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

07.24.2012   Posted In: NP0022 Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?   By Psychotherapy Networker
4
Comments
 

Attachment Issues: Embracing Disowned Parts with Janina Fisher

 

The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy: NP0021 --- Session 5

Discover how to join with self-loathing clients who are so filled with feelings of shame and worthlessness that they find little benefit from the therapeutic relationship. Janina Fisher, who lectures and writes about integrating neuroscience research and body-centered approaches into psychotherapy, guides the viewer on how to help clients heal their attachment issues and gain self-compassion and acceptance.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

 
07.19.2012   Posted In: NP0021 The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy   By Psychotherapy Networker
4
Comments
 

Why We Cry

 

And How Understanding Our Nervous Systems Can Help

Why do we cry? And what’s the basic definition of emotion, anyway?


Learn from professor of psychology Jay Efran about his two-stage theory on why we cry and how to more effectively handle those situations in which our clients burst into tears in session. Based on his article in the May/June 2012 issue with Mitchell Greene, “Why We Cry: A Clinician’s Guide,” this clip will illustrate the thesis of their theory and provide a real-life, practical example.



Jay’s presentation is part of our new streaming-video webcast series, “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room.”


Jay Efran, Ph.D., is emeritus professor of psychology at Temple University. He’s the coauthor of Language, Structure, and Change: Frameworks of Meaning in Psychotherapy and The Tao of Sobriety.


The Emotion Revolution:
Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

Starts Wednesday, July 25th

Click here for full course details.

07.17.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
9
Comments
 

Overcoming Our Fears with Ellyn Bader and Peter Pearson

 

Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?: NP0022 – Session 1 

Welcome to our “Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?” This exciting series, back by popular demand, is based on our November/December 2011 issue on this topic and will explore the challenges of couples work.

What are the most effective strategies in working with couples? How can therapists structure therapy—particularly in the early sessions—so that couples leave with a sense of hope, rather than frustration? Can working with individuals who have serious issues in their relationships actually be detrimental to them? Find out the answers to these questions and much more. In this first session with expert couples therapists Ellyn Bader and Peter Pearson, the creators of the Developmental Model of Couples Therapy, you’ll find out why clinicians often avoid working with couples and how you can better prepare yourself for couples therapy work.

Throughout the series, a Comment Board after each session will be available. The Comment Boards are a way for participants to share thoughts and reflections about what was most interesting and to ask questions of the presenters and of each other. We invite and encourage you to use these Comment Boards as a forum for thought and to continue the conversation sparked by each session. After listening to this first session, please just take a few minutes to share what you think. What was most striking about this session? What questions do you have?  

Thank you so much for your participation, and welcome to this relevant and important series. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org. 

 

 

07.17.2012   Posted In: NP0022 Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?   By Psychotherapy Networker
4
Comments
 

Helping Clients with Anger Problems

 

How to Create a Brain-Change Plan with Angry Clients

How can you help angry clients calm themselves—and maintain your own equilibrium—both in and out of therapy?


Clinical psychologist Ron Potter-Efron says that understanding the principles of neuroplasticity can help both you and your clients better deal with anger and reactivity. Check out this clip to discover how knowing about brain function can help your clients who have anger issues.



Ron Potter-Efron, Ph.D., a clinical psychotherapist, is co-owner of First Things First Counseling and Consulting and director of its Anger Management Center. He’s the author of Shame, Guilt, and Alcoholism, Angry All the Time, and Healing the Angry Brain.


What are some techniques you use in therapy when clients get angry, or when you find yourself becoming angry? Let us know.


The Emotion Revolution:
Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

Starts Wednesday, July 25th

Click here for full course details.

07.12.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
0
Comments
 

How to Avoid Resistance in Therapy with Clifton Mitchell

 

The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy: NP0021 - Session 4

Learn how to sidestep common clinical mistakes that promote resistance, and ways to overcome resistance if it does occur. Professor and author of Effective Techniques for Dealing with Highly Resistant Clients, Clifton Mitchell describes the best approaches to circumvent resistance, from clarifying goals, slowing down the pace, and helping clients find emotionally compelling reasons to change.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

07.12.2012   Posted In: NP0021 The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy   By Psychotherapy Networker
6
Comments
 

Treating the Mixed-Agenda Couple

 

What Should You Do When Partners Have Contradictory Goals

What should you do when one partner in a couple is serious about divorce while the other hopes to save the marriage?


In this clip from our upcoming streaming-video webcast series “Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?” family therapist William Doherty discusses the problems that arise in couples therapy when one partner is leaning in and the other is leaning away from the marriage. Listen to the clip below to find out what he thinks you can do if you find yourself in this challenging situation.


William Doherty, Ph.D., is a professor and director of the Citizen Professional Center at the University of Minnesota. He’s the author or coauthor of 12 books on families and family therapy, including Take Back Your Marriage, Take Back Your Kids, and Family Therapy, with Susan McDaniel.


Want to hear more on this topic? Bill Doherty also wrote an article that explores this topic in our popular November/December 2011 issue, which you can read here.


Have you ever found yourself in this situation with a couple? How did you handle it? Let us know.


Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?
Starts Tuesday, July 17th

Click here for full course details.

07.10.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
3
Comments
 

Men and Depression with Holly Sweet

 

Men in Therapy: NP0020 - Session 6

Discover the different ways men and woman experience depression, with psychologist and co-director of the Cambridge Center for Gender Relations, Holly Sweet. Learn how to use a more task-oriented, coaching approach to work with men who are unwilling to ask for help with their depression, accept medications, or express vulnerable emotions.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

07.10.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
27
Comments
 

The Brain’s Negativity Bias: Taking in the Good

 

The Role of Evolution in our Emotions

Rick Hanson, the best-selling author of Buddha’s Brain, sets the stage for the need to counteract our brain’s inborn, evolutionary tendency to interpret negative experiences as threats to survival. Instead, he offers concrete methods for helping people translate positive experiences—both inside and outside the consulting room—into enduring internal resources that are at the core of therapeutic healing.



Rick is one of several noted clinicians in our upcoming streaming-video series “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body, and Soul in the Consulting Room” who demonstrate innovative methods for utilizing clients’ direct emotional experience to greatly enhance the effectiveness of psychotherapy.


To read more about how therapists can work directly work emotion in session, take a look at our May/June 2012 issue here.


Rick Hanson, Ph.D., is a neuropsychologist with an interest in the intersection of psychology, neurology, and Buddhism, and an invited presenter at Oxford, Stanford, and the University of California at Berkeley. He’s the author of 15 books, including Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom.


The Emotion Revolution:
Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

Starts Wednesday, July 25th

Click here for full course details.

07.05.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
1
Comments
 

Treating the Narcissistic Client with Wendy Behary

 

The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy: NP0021 - Session 3

Explore a treatment plan for clients with narcissistic personality disorder that helps you maintain compassion while achieving leverage. Wendy Behary, author of Disarming the Narcissist: Surviving and Thriving with the Self-Absorbed, teaches how to use tactical confrontation, cognitive restructuring, behavioral therapy and skills training, experiential psychotherapy, and more.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

07.05.2012   Posted In: NP0021 The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy   By Psychotherapy Networker
15
Comments
 

Angry Women, Withdrawn Men

 

Breaking Through in Couples Therapy

If you’ve ever worked with a couple, you know the palpable tension of a first session. There’s the fed-up wife and the husband who’s reluctantly agreed to come to therapy.

In the clip below, Jette Simon, a Senior Clinical Instructor in Imago Therapy, offers a step-by-step account of how she goes about creating a safe therapeutic space for both partners—despite their history and conflicts—and begins to engage them in a process of change.



To read more about the challenging work of couples therapy and how we can become more prepared to work with couples in session, see our November/December 2011 issue on couples therapy here.


Jette Simon, Lic., who conducts basic and advanced training programs in Imago Relationship Therapy, is the director of the Washington, D.C. Institute for Couples Therapy, and is a Senior Clinical Instructor for Imago International. She’s the author of Imago: The Therapy of Love.


Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?
Starts Tuesday, July 17th

Click here for full course details.

07.03.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
0
Comments
 

No Emotion Allowed Here—Therapist at Work!

 

The Emotional Revolution

As therapists, probably most of us know only too well the queasy, anxious feeling we had as young practitioners (maybe even still have) when faced with a highly emotional client, perhaps sobbing uncontrollably in the chair across from us. Trained to believe that our job is to help that person feel better, we want to do something or say something that will provide comfort and ease that pain. But all too often, there’s been almost nothing in our academic education and survey of clinical theories to help us feel at home with our clients’ emotions, much less our own. 

And what about sitting face Emotional clientto face in a room with someone in a state of transferential rage—yelling, pounding the chair, blaming us for his/her problem? And couples! No wonder so many couples therapists favor coaching clients in highly cognitive skills-building and problem-solving techniques. In one interview of our upcoming webcast series on emotion, Sue Johnson remembers many years ago watching a therapist basically scold couples who seemed to be getting too upset, even sending one partner out of the room to calm down. The title of that session must surely have been, “No emotion here, please—therapist at work!”

This fear of out-of-control emotions, even among therapists who are supposed to be comfortable with “strong affect,” as we hygienically call it, reflects an old Cartesian prejudice in Western society against the “lower,” messier emotions—primitive, animal-like passions rooted in the body. For many hundreds of years, we’ve preferred the more respectable, “higher” faculties of logic and reason, products of the thinking, rational mind. From the very beginning, psychotherapy models, of whatever stripe, have shared this cultural bias. Rather than welcome emotions into the consulting room, they’ve tended to regard excessive expressions of emotion as symptoms of something awry in the psyche. The clinical goal has often been to get all that raw stuff under control. Freud’s directive—“Where id was, there shall ego be”—has been the implicit watchword for one hundred years of psychotherapy practice.

But, lo and behold, over the past two or three decades—even just in the last 10 years—we’ve been witness to nothing less than a revolution in our knowledge and understanding of emotion. Neuroscience research, for example, has demonstrated beyond all doubt that emotion is itself the driving force of much of our mental life, including our precious reasoning faculties. “We’re not necessarily thinking machines,” says renowned neuroscientist Antonio Damasio, “but feeling machines that think.” Without the literally moving force of affect—e-motion —we’re like high-IQ slugs in a sense, not likely to go anywhere or do much of anything except munch on whatever nutrients fall in our path. Without emotion, we’d be like disabled computers, with no desire, love, sadness, fear, need, impatience, anger, frustration, enthusiasm—those experiential states that literally turn us on, make us go. Without emotion, the wiring may be in place, but the power has been disconnected.

Luckily, therapists are also beginning to catch up to the neuroscience in their growing recognition that working sensitively and skillfully with clients’ emotions is critical to clinical success. In our new Networker webcast series beginning July 18th, “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room,” I talk with 6 therapeutic innovators—Susan Johnson, Rick Hanson, Joan Klagsbrun, Jay Efran, Ron Potter-Efron, and Diana Fosha—about the latest developments in helping clients experience emotion as a coherent, vital, enlivening force in their relational lives.

But even more than that, this group of noted contributors to our field show us the importance of how navigating through the ebb and flow of emotion is at the heart of our therapeutic craft. As Damasio has written, “Most of what we construct as wisdom over time is the result of cultivating the knowledge about how our emotions behave and what we learn from them.” I hope you can join us as we explore that state of our current clinical wisdom about the role of emotion in effective psychotherapy.

Want to read more on emotion in the consulting room? Take a look at the May/June 2012 issue here to peruse articles from some of the field’s visionaries, including Susan Johnson.

The Emotion Revolution:
Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

Starts Wednesday, July 25th

Click here for full course details.

06.29.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Rich Simon
21
Comments
 

The Healing Power of Emotion

 

Harnessing the Strength of Emotion with Susan Johnson

No one has been more instrumental in bringing “The Emotional Revolution” into the consulting room than master clinician Susan Johnson. In the video clip below, Sue describes her time as a grad student when the direct experience of emotion was seen as a disruptive force in the consulting room rather than a potential source of deep healing and connection.



Read Susan Johnson’s recent article on this topic FREE. It’s the cover feature article in the May/June issue of the Networker, “The Power of Emotion in Therapy.”


Susan Johnson, Ed.D., professor of clinical psychology, is one of the developers of Emotionally Focused Therapy. She’s the director of the Ottawa Couple and Family Institute and the International Center for Excellence in EFT. Her latest book is Hold Me Tight: Seven Conversations for a Lifetime of Love.


Learn more about Sue’s presentation and all the other conversations that are part of our new upcoming streaming-video webcast series:


The Emotion Revolution:
Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

Starts Wednesday, July 25th

Click here for full course details.

06.29.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
0
Comments
 

Motivating the Reluctant Male Client

 

Achieving Leverage with Resistant Men

Every couples therapist knows that men are often dragged kicking and screaming into therapy by their partners. But how do you work with a client who doesn’t want to be there in the first place?


In the clip below, Terry Real, the founder of the Relational Life Institute, explains how he achieves “leverage” with reluctant male clients and how that fits with his idea about the typical dynamics of troubled couples. If you’ve never heard Terry present on his innovative approach that challenges many of the conventions of traditional couples work, you have a treat in store for you. Just click here or on the video below:



To get more information about the complete Networker webcast series, “Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know,”, including interviews with Esther Perel, David Wexler, Pat Love and Terry, among others, just click here.

Engaging Men In Therapy:
Everything Clinicians Need to Know

Starts Tuesday, June 5th

Click here for full course details.

06.28.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
0
Comments
 

Customizing Mental Health Treatment with John Norcross

 

Challenging Issues: NP0021 – Session 2

 

Discover an assessment protocol to identify six personal characteristics that’ll allow you to customize treatment to match clients’ needs. Distinguished professor of psychology and clinical psychologist John Norcross explores how to identify these personal characteristics to achieve more effective treatment.  

 

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.
06.28.2012   Posted In: NP0021 The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy   By Psychotherapy Networker
4
Comments
 

The Dance of Intimacy

 

The Art of Nonverbal Connection

To make intimacy come alive in a troubled relationship, a therapist must know how to help couples connect nonverbally.


See how noted couples therapist Hedy Schleifer uses touch, gaze, and other nonverbal cues in her work in this clip from our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, “Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?”



Hedy Schleifer, M.A., L.M.H.C., is an internationally known couples therapist, workshop presenter, and clinical trainer. She’s pioneered the training of Imago Relationship therapists internationally. She’s the founder of the Tikkun Learning Center, an educational institution through which she trains therapists in Encounter-Centered Couples Therapy..


Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?
Starts Tuesday, July 17th

Click here for full course details.

06.26.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
0
Comments
     

    Overcoming Resistance in Male Clients with Terry Real

     

    Men in Therapy: NP0020 - Session 2

    Learn how to get through to resistant male clients by avoiding the potential pitfalls of therapeutic neutrality. Renowned family therapist Terry Real, the founder of the Relational Life Institute, explores how to deal with male clients by highlighting the negative consequences of their resistance, and challenging them to change their behavior by “joining through the truth.”

    After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

    06.26.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
    6
    Comments
     

    How to Help Clients Cope With Overwhelming Emotion

     

    The Focusing Method with Joan Klagsbrun

    Helping clients deal with overwhelming emotion can be a challenge. Explore the effectiveness of using the Focusing method and encouraging clients to befriend their inner experience in this clip from our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room.”


    In this excerpt, Joan Klagsbrun discusses three techniques therapists can use to enable their clients to develop the right relationship with their inner experience and appropriately deal with feelings of intense emotion.



    Joan Klagsbrun, Ph.D., a psychologist in private practice in the Boston area and an adjunct faculty member at Lesley University, has been teaching Focusing internationally for more than 30 years.


    The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind
    Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

    Starts Wednesday, July 25th

    Click here for full course details.

    06.22.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
    4
    Comments
       

      Beginning Therapy with High-Conflict Couples

       

      Tips from Ellyn Bader and Peter Pearson

      Highly distressed couples seek out help for immediate solutions for their pain and suffering. Why is tackling the issues head-on a big mistake for a therapist?


      Learn from noted couples therapists Ellyn Bader and Peter Pearson on how couples in therapy have deeply complex, embedded issues that need to be approached thoughtfully. Watch the video clip below:



      This clip is from our streaming-video webcast series, “Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?” Join us for thought-provoking conversations with noted couples experts and explore the challenges of couples work and how you can be more effective in the consulting room.


      Ellyn Bader, Ph.D., and Peter Pearson, Ph.D., couples therapists for more than 25 years, are the founders and directors of The Couples Institute and creators of the Developmental Model of Couples Therapy. They’re the authors of In Quest of the Mythical Mate: A Developmental Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment in Couples Therapy.


      Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy
      Starts Tuesday, July 17th

      Click here for full course details.

      06.21.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
      0
      Comments
       

      When Therapy Stalls with William Doherty

       

      The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy: NP0021 - Session 1

      Welcome to “The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy…And How Therapists Can Overcome Them.” In this series, leading innovators in the field will explore specific kinds of cases and clients that can stump even veteran therapists—narcissists, resistant clients, individuals with borderline personality disorder, and more. Each session will focus on concrete, practical strategies that’ll help you when facing these kinds of difficult cases.

      In this first session, marriage and family therapist William Doherty highlights some techniques to follow when a client isn’t following the treatment plan, continues to follow a self-destructive path, or simply isn’t making progress. Learn how to avoid sounding like a disappointed parent or threatening to abandon the client when therapy stalls.

      After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

      06.21.2012   Posted In: NP0021 The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy   By Psychotherapy Networker
      12
      Comments
       
      << < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>
      I do blog this IDoBlog Community