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Using Mindfulness to Accept Emotionality: Deepening the Moment with Diana Fosha

 

The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 6

Explore how to use mindfulness and meta-processing to help clients witness and accept, rather than avoid, their emotional processes. Learn from Diana Fosha, the developer of Accelerated Experiential-Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP) and director of the AEDP Institute, how to understand the role of mindfulness and meta-processing in helping clients accept their emotions, how to define "glimmers of growth" and the importance of growth with clients who have experienced trauma, and how to explain the significance of helping clients learn how to stay in the present moment.


If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

08.29.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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Treating Anxiety: The Key is Motivation

 

David Burns on the Paradox of Resistance

According to renowned expert on anxiety David Burns, far and away the biggest barrier to treating it successfully-- sometimes even in a single session-- is recognizing how many clients covertly hold onto their symptoms, even when they restrict their lives and seem to cause them enormous distress.


That's because, deep down, they believe that their anxiety protects them more than it disrupts their lives. Add to that the fact that so much anxiety treatment involves some form of exposure to the very thing that causes them so much discomfort, clients have pretty compelling reasons to resist the onerous process of transforming their anxiety. That’s why the drop-out rates for anxiety treatment are so high.


Recently David has discovered that through a method that directly addresses the perceived perils of change in the very first session of therapy, he was able to forge an entirely different kind of collaborative alliance with client from the get-go. He began to see results beyond anything he had previously achieved in his long and distinguished career. The key was not starting the process of treatment before the client was truly ready to begin.


In this clip, David tells the memorable tale of a case that pivoted dramatically on what he calls this “paradoxical agenda-setting.”



David is just one of the six innovators included in our upcoming video webcast series on Treating Anxiety: The Latest Advances. It offers a vivid look at the practical methods experts on anxiety treatment like Reid Wilson, Danie Beaulieu, Steve Andreas, Lynn Lyons and Margaret Wehrenberg have to offer that can expand your own clinical repertoire with psychotherapy’s most common presenting problem. To learn more about this exciting new webcast, click here.


To learn more about the latest developments in understanding anxiety, its roots in our neurophysiology and practical methods for effective treatment, check out these free articles:


"10 Best Ever Anxiety Management Techniques" by Margaret Wehrenberg and "The Language of the Nervous System" by Laurie Leitch and Elaine Miller-Karas.

08.29.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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The Logic of Eroticism with Marty Klein

 

Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?: NP0022 – Bonus Session 1

Join Marty Klein, a marriage and family therapist and certified sex therapist, us for a candid discussion about the assumptions that both clients and therapists often share that can get in the way of improving couples’ sexual relationships.

After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

08.28.2012   Posted In: NP0022 Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?   By Psychotherapy Networker
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Anxiety: Our Paradoxical Companion

 

If we revisit our earliest memories, it’s there: maybe a vague agitation in the absence of any immediate awareness of what the big deal was or perhaps a mysteriously heart-thumping reaction to some scary fantasy unanchored in everyday reality. While fear is our hair trigger response to the threats right in front of our nose, anxiety is our early-warning system-- evolution’s way of helping us navigate a complex environment whose perils aren’t always obvious and close-at-hand. We learn early in life that, while fear is typically concrete and literal, anxiety is often a construct of the imagination, albeit one that rarely brings much creative satisfaction.

Anxiety

From as far back as most of us can remember, anxiety is one of our most intimate companions. And if we are temperamentally wired for vigilance and reactivity, it can become constant company, even when an outside observer might think we should be carefree. One of life’s early discoveries is that, even when we’re telling ourselves there’s nothing to worry about, it’s hard to "just say no" to anxiety- there’s no obvious off-switch to that familiar roiling tumult that can so suddenly hijack our nervous system, however frantically we may search for one. In fact, that quest for a magical off-switch, more than any other human yearning, may be the primary reason that people seek out psychotherapists.

For most of us, our relationship with anxiety is clouded by a fundamental confusion. Evolution appears to have appointed anxiety to be our Guardian, a personal security system dedicated to keeping us out of harm’s way, sometimes even in the absence of any real danger. The biological power and persistence of anxiety lies in this fundamentally benign function—at its root, whatever its tendency to send us false positives about the presence of danger, its intent is to keep us safe. But so much of the time, we experience our anxiety as a relentless Tormentor, a source of unnecessary suffering that we desperately try to ignore, avoid, wish away or, failing that, carpet bomb with medication. The failure of these customary remedies for anxiety has made it the leading presenting problem in therapists’ caseloads around the world.

So what’s the state of our knowledge about how to help the world’s anxiety sufferers? In the Networker’s upcoming video webcast series, Treating Anxiety: Latest Advances beginning September 18th, some of the field’s foremost clinical innovators—David Burns, Margaret Wehrenberg, Danie Beaulieu, Steve Andreas, Lynn Lyons, and Reid Wilson—will demonstrate the discoveries they’ve made about shifting our relationship with anxiety and disentangling the paradoxical roles it too often plays in our lives. We hope you’ll take advantage of this opportunity to acquire some powerful tools you’ll be able to put to use in your practice--and, perhaps, your life—right away.

Want to now more about Anxiety? Check out these two free articles, "Brain to Brain: The Talking Cure Goes Beyond Words" by Janina Fisher and "Grand Illusion: Has the American Dream Become Our Nightmare?" by Mary Sykes Wylie from Psychotherapy Networker Magazine.

There are more free Anxiety resources in our Popular Topic Library--articles including "The Ten Best-Ever Anxiety Management Techniques" by Margaret Wehrenberg, "The Anxious Client Reconsidered: Getting Beyond Symptoms to Deeper Change" by Graham Campbell, and "Facing Our Worst Fears: Finding the Courage to Stay in the Moment" by Reid Wilson.

 

Interested in the roles of temperament and attachement in Anxiety issues? Check out the March/April 2011 issue, "The Great Attachment Debate".


Looking for quick CEs? Take our reading course, "Treating The Anxious Client".

 

08.24.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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    The Five Essential Ingredients of Effective Trauma Treatment with Mary Jo Barrett

     

    The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment: NP0024 – Session 1

    Welcome to "The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment: New Perspectives on PTSD." This series will explore the clinical implications of the latest advances from attachment, development, and neurobiological research and how to effectively apply them with clients. What’s the best way to structure treatment with trauma clients? How can therapists help clients reshape their trauma narrative? How can clinicians effectively tailor therapy to meet clients’ needs in the context of trauma? Discover the answers to these questions and much more.

    In this first session with Mary Jo Barrett, the founder and director of the Center for Contextual Change, she’ll explain what she’s identified as the five essential ingredients to effective trauma work, through the lens of a structured, collaborative method of working with clients.

    After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

    08.22.2012   Posted In: NP0024 The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment: New Perspectives on PTSD   By Psychotherapy Networker
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    Healing the Angry Brain with Ron Potter-Efron

     

    The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 5

    Dealing with an angry client can be a frustrating roadblock in therapy. Learn from Ron Potter-Efron, author of Healing The Angry Brain, about different types of anger, how to assess coping strategies for your client, and how to use those powerful emotions to the benefit of both the therapist and client. After the session, please let us know what you think.

    If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

    08.22.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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    Taking Off the Masks: Truth-Telling in Couples Work with David Schnarch

     

    Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?: NP0022 – Session 6

    Hear an unconventional perspective on couples therapy from David Schnarch, who believes that the best way to help couples is to challenge partners to change their individual behaviors and attitudes. Schnarch’s direct, upfront approach to helping clients will illustrate a different viewpoint on effective couples therapy.

    After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

    08.21.2012   Posted In: NP0022 Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?   By Psychotherapy Networker
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    Getting Past Trauma

     

    Diana Fosha On Bring Out Clients' Dormant Resilience

    As therapists, we all know that you can have a seemingly safe, trusting bond with a traumatized client and still not have it translate into real changes in that person's life.

     

    In a recent interview with Rich Simon, Diana Fosha, originator of Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP), shows us how to move to a different level of connection with clients that can make a difference outside the consulting room.

     

    It’s all about being in the relational moment.

     

    In this clip she explains how attending to what she calls "micro-tracking"--picking up on small changes in expression and affect--can add enormous power to work with people who've been traumatized.

    Diana is one of six innovators interviewed in our webcast series starting August 23rd, the Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment, in which she vividly demonstrates how to move beyond a focus on trauma to bring out a client's dormant resilience.


     

     


    Free interview with Diana Fosha: Read an interview between Diana Fosha and Psychotherapy Networker magazine author Ryan Howes in “Point of View: The Alphabet Soup”.

     

    Free Resources on trauma: Check out these two free articles from Psychotherapy Networker Magazine: “Applying The Brakes In Trauma Treatment, Safety is Essential” by Babette Rothschild and “The End of Innocence: Reconsidering Our Concepts of Victimhood” by Dusty Miller.

     

    Free Resources on attachment: Check out The Great Attachment Debate, a popular issue of Psychotherapy Networker Magazine, available to read for free online.

     

    Explore more Diana Fosha in Audio Courses available The Challenge of Engagement: A Moment-to-Moment Approach to Experiential Therapy and Accessing the Higher Self: From Suffering to Flourishing.

     

    About Diana Fosha: Diana is the developer of Accelerated Experiential-Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP) and director of the AEDP Institute. She’s the author of The Transforming Power of Affect: A Model for Accelerated Change and a coeditor of The Healing Power of Emotion: Affective Neuroscience, Development, and Clinical Practice.


    08.17.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      Teenage Problems, Traumatic Childhoods and the Work of the Therapist in the Juvenile Justice System

       

      Ken Hardy Talks about Creating Safety and Connecting with Teens in Trouble

      Ken Hardy calls us to expand how we think about the connection among trauma, race, poverty and marginalization. In this recent conversation with Rich Simon, he shows us how he puts these ideas to work in ways that you’ll find surprising, powerful, and, at times, very moving.


      Ken illustrates how to translate broad ideas about the sociocultural context into interventions that shift the therapeutic process in ways that open up new possibilities for connection. Watch the clip below to see how he looks for what’s heroic and resourceful in the story of a tough young black man who others might find “resistant,” even menacing.


      Ken is part of our webcast series, The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment, that re-launches on August 23rd. His interview demonstrates how to work with the most reluctant of therapy clients with respect, authenticity and a passionate belief in the possibility of healing.



      Free Resources on trauma and treatment for teenagers in trouble: Check out these two free articles co-authored by Ken Hardy from Psychotherapy Networker Magazine: “Creating a Zone of Safety and Connection for Angry Black Teens” and “When ‘Them’ Become ‘Us.’”


      Explore more in the Free Popular Topic Library where you’ll find 12 popular articles on Adolescents and Trauma including “The Logic of Self Injury: A Teen Symptom of Our Time” by Martha Straus and “Mission Possible: The Art of Engaging Tough Teens” by Matthew Selekman. Audio Courses available include Helping Adolescent Girls in Crisis by Martha Straus and Breaking Through to Teens by Ron Taffel.


      About Ken Hardy: Ken is the director of the Eikenberg Institute for Relationships and professor of family therapy at Drexel University. He’s co-authored two books— Teens Who Hurt: Clinical Interventions to Break the Cycle of Adolescent Violence and Revisioning Family Therapy: Race, Culture, and Gender in Clinical Practice.

      08.15.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      Our Brain's Negativity Bias: Taking in the Good with Rick Hanson

       

      The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 - Session 4

      In this session, you'll learn why positive emotions are often an underutilized resource in treatment and why people are vulnerable to negative biases. With Rick Hanson, you'll explore the benefits of helping clients internalize positive emotions.


      After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant. These comment boards will be a valuable way to share your thoughts, opinions, and questions throughout the series. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to contact support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

      08.15.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      Angry Women, Withdrawn Men: Breaking Through in Couples Therapy with Jette Simon

       

      Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?: NP0022 – Session 5

      Explore this classic dynamic of couples therapy—an angry woman and a withdrawn man—that’s often confusing for therapists, with couples therapist Jette Simon. Learn more about what’s behind the feelings of anger and the behavior of withdrawing, and how clinicians can more effectively work with shame and fear of disconnection.


      After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

      08.14.2012   Posted In: NP0022 Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      When Your Client Cries with Jay Efran

       

      The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 3

      Discover how the latest findings on the psychobiology of crying can help you harness a client’s tears in session to engage with, understand, and regulate their emotions. Professor of psychology Jay Efran, who coauthored a compelling article on the topic in our May/June 2012 issue, discusses the practical do’s and don’ts of what to do when your client cries. Read the article here.

      After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant. These comment boards will be a valuable way to share your thoughts, opinions, and questions throughout the series. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to contact support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

      08.08.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      Confidentiality, Secrets, and How to Deal with Affairs with Esther Perel

       

      Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?: NP0022 – Session 4

       

      Is it possible to rebuild trust and intimacy in a couple’s relationship after a partner has had an affair? How can therapists help? Hear from Esther Perel, author of the international bestseller Mating in Captivity: Unlocking Erotic Intelligence, on how to help couples after an infidelity and the role that cultural perspectives have in this emotional situation.

      After the session, please let us know what you think. If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org. 

      08.07.2012   Posted In: NP0022 Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      Reshaping the Trauma Narrative

       

      In his upcoming session of our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, “The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment: New Perspectives on PTSD,” Don Meichenbaum explains how to help clients find the more positive “untold” story behind the trauma they experienced.


      In this clip, Meichenbaum demonstrates the first step to effective trauma work: forming a therapeutic alliance with the client through the use of “what” and “how” questions distributed over the course of the session. Watch the clip to hear examples of such questions, and learn why they are so effective.



      Don Meichenbaum, Ph.D., a founder of Cognitive Behavioral Modification, was voted one of the 10 most influential psychotherapists of the century in a survey reported in the American Psychologist. An expert in the treatment of PTSD, he’s the author of A Clinical Handbook/Practical Therapist Manual of Assessing and Treating Adults with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.


      The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment
      New Perspectives on PTSD

      Starts Thursday, August 23rd

      Click here for full course details.

      08.03.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      Bringing the Felt Sense into Psychotherapy with Joan Klagsburn

       

      The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 2

       

      Learn how to use the Focusing method to help clients talk about from their feelings rather than about them. Joan Klagsbrun, who’s pioneered the field of the Focusing method, discusses how to deepen the client’s lived experience by forming an intimate connection with their inner knowing that hasn’t yet been formed into words or thoughts.

      After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to contact support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

      08.01.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      Helping Couples with Different Divorce Agendas with William Doherty

       

      Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?: NP0022 – Session 3

      What happens when partners in couples therapy have two different agendas in mind? Hear from expert William Doherty on this little spoken about topic. Learn how Discernment Counseling, an approach that helps couples clarify their feelings about the next step in their relationship, can help both clients and therapists.

      After the session, please let us know what you think. What’s your experience with mixed-agenda couples in therapy? What questions remain for you now? Let us know what you think.

      If you ever have any technical questions or issues, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org.

      07.31.2012   Posted In: NP0022 Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      The Wounds That Time Won’t Heal: Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment

       

      When I first began studying psychotherapy in the early 1970s, for all practical purposes the field had never heard of trauma. Back then, the prevalence and destructive impact of child abuse and domestic violence were virtually unknown, and nobody realized how much terrible events and extreme suffering could profoundly impair our very neurobiology. At that time almost the entire focus of psychotherapy was on the family melodramas involving middle class parents and their basically safe and privileged children. This was territory I knew very well—I had experienced enough of my own family’s emotional theatrics to keep several therapists duly employed over the years.


      But the “discovery” of trauma—particularly the identification and naming of PTSD—introduced me and our entire field to another world entirely. I began to realize the vast chasm between the rather “small-u” unhappiness I had experienced in my relatively sheltered life and the unrelenting pervasive misery of people who had experienced the worst that can befall human beings. The lives of these people had been profoundly altered. For them, time—even with psychotherapy—did not heal all wounds. Unlike the fractious, stressful circumstances of my own childhood, traumatic memories often couldn’t be talked into submission through ordinary therapy. These clients showed symptoms—flashbacks, suicide attempts, nightmares, paralyzing anxiety, dissociation, substance abuse—that were much more complicated and intractable than anything most therapists were prepared to deal with.


      This was all far from experience. And yet, on one occasion I came horribly close to viscerally understanding what psychic trauma really felt like. Driving home one dark, wet night on a slippery road, not paying enough attention to what I was doing, I turned onto another road and a car I hadn’t seen was forced to swerve to avoid me. For what seemed like a lifetime, I watched helplessly as the driver braked with a great squeal of ties. As a burst of sparks rose up from its undercarriage, the car jackknifed across the road and hurled directly toward a concrete wall, stopping just inches short of it. Thank God the couple in the car were not hurt, but they were too shocked even to reply to my stammered apologies. Afterward, I lay awake night after night, replaying the event over and over and over again, imagining a far worse outcome.


      After some months, I did recover, but I can still feel a twinge in my gut when I think of that night. For many people who experience full-fledged, severe, and/or chronic trauma, however, there is no recovery, no safe comfort zone to which they can retreat, no ability to control what goes on in their own bodies and minds. This is why I have a certain kind of awe for people who make treating traumatized clients their specialty. They really do seem like a breed apart, even from the rest of the therapy world.


      Which brings me to our upcoming webcast series, The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment, which features video interviews with half a dozen of the world’s most knowledgeable and adept practitioners of trauma therapy. Listening to them describe in vivid detail, with fascinating stories and examples, exactly how they go about practicing their particular approach—we not only get a sense of different ways of looking at trauma, but see a fascinating variety of clinical talent and creativity in action.


      We get a visceral sense from Chris Courtois, for example, of the often eerie experience of working with a person with dissociative identity disorder. Somatic therapist Pat Ogden offers a close-up glimpse of the non-verbal, healing choreography of her approach. Don Meichenbaum plays a kind of therapeutic Columbo using disarmingly crafted questions to help clients realize not how traumatized they are, but rather the hidden stories of inner strength and resilience that have allowed them to move on in their lives. Diana Fosha shows how skillfully she uses herself to break the profound sense of loneliness and isolation that characterizes many trauma clients. Widening the clinical implications of social context factors, Ken Hardy describes his work with clients marginalized by poverty and racism. Mary Jo Barrett identifies five simple but highly critical ingredients in effective trauma treatment. Finally, Francine Shapiro gives us a nuts and bolts lesson about how to use EMDR to treat trauma clients.

      So I hope you’ll join us for what I think are a series of candid, inspiring conversations with practitioners who embody the very highest ideals of our profession, but who also have so much to offer in mastering the craft of responding to some of the most profound challenges we face as healing professionals.


      The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment:
      New Perspectives on PTSD

      Starts Thursday, August 23rd

      Click here for full course details.

      07.27.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        Treating Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder

         

        The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy: NP0021 - Session 6

        How do you work with borderline personality disorder clients without lapsing into feelings of defensiveness? Richard Schwartz, originator of the Internal Family Systems model, describes working with borderline personality disorder clients who are preoccupied with protecting their vulnerable inner “parts” and can respond to mental health treatment with anger, impulsiveness, and aggressiveness.

        Please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant in this session and about the entire series. What do you feel most connected to? What questions remain for you?

        As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

        07.26.2012   Posted In: NP0021 The 6 Most Challenging Issues in Therapy   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        The 5 Essential Ingredients of Effective Trauma Treatment

         

        Exploring the Do’s and Don’ts of Trauma Work

        Mary Jo Barrett, as part of our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, “The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment: New Perspectives on PTSD,” explores the most important fundamentals in working with trauma clients. In her presentation, she’ll outline how to effectively structure a collaborative approach to treatment.


        In this clip, Barrett discusses how she uses the natural cycle of growth as a metaphor for traumatized clients, thus helping the clients to acknowledge those cycles and expand to new realities.



        Mary Jo Barrett, M.S.W., the founder and director of the Center for Contextual Change, teaches at the University of Chicago. She’s the coauthor of Systemic Treatment of Incest and coeditor of Treating Incest: A Multimodal Systems Perspective.


        The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment:
        New Perspectives on PTSD

        Starts Thursday, August 23rd

        Click here for full course details.

        07.24.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        Harnessing the Power of Emotion with Susan Johnson

         

        The Emotion Revolution: NP0023 – Session 1

        Welcome to “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room.” In this series, leading innovators in the field will explore how therapists can work more deeply and usefully with emotions in the consulting room---our own and the clients’. Each session will uncover different methods and techniques you can use to better utilize emotion in session.

        In this first session with Susan Johnson, one of the developers of Emotionally Focused Therapy, you’ll discover methods to work more experientially with volatile emotions in the consulting room by delving into the client’s deeper attachment issues. You’ll learn to help clients achieve a more profound and enduring level of healing without resorting to controlling or distancing a client’s potentially explosive emotions. You can take a look at her compelling article on the same topic in our May/June 2012 issue, "The Power of Emotion in Therapy" here.

        After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant. These comment boards will be a valuable way to share your thoughts, opinions, and questions throughout the series. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to contact support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.



        07.24.2012   Posted In: NP0023 The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room   By Psychotherapy Networker
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