My Networker Login   |   
feed-60facebook-60twitter-60linkedin-60youtube-60
 
Tag: Men in Therapy

Men and Depression with Holly Sweet

 

Men in Therapy: NP0020 - Session 6

Discover the different ways men and woman experience depression, with psychologist and co-director of the Cambridge Center for Gender Relations, Holly Sweet. Learn how to use a more task-oriented, coaching approach to work with men who are unwilling to ask for help with their depression, accept medications, or express vulnerable emotions.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

07.10.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
27
Comments
 

Men and Intimacy: A Relational Approach with Patrick Dougherty

 

Men in Therapy: NP0020 - Session 5

Learn how to open men up to intimacy through a mind/body/heart approach. Psychologist and qigong teacher Patrick Dougherty teaches how to connect therapeutically with men and to challenge them to find the value of and capacity for intimate relationships.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

07.03.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
13
Comments
 

Motivating the Reluctant Male Client

 

Achieving Leverage with Resistant Men

Every couples therapist knows that men are often dragged kicking and screaming into therapy by their partners. But how do you work with a client who doesn’t want to be there in the first place?


In the clip below, Terry Real, the founder of the Relational Life Institute, explains how he achieves “leverage” with reluctant male clients and how that fits with his idea about the typical dynamics of troubled couples. If you’ve never heard Terry present on his innovative approach that challenges many of the conventions of traditional couples work, you have a treat in store for you. Just click here or on the video below:



To get more information about the complete Networker webcast series, “Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know,”, including interviews with Esther Perel, David Wexler, Pat Love and Terry, among others, just click here.

Engaging Men In Therapy:
Everything Clinicians Need to Know

Starts Tuesday, June 5th

Click here for full course details.

06.28.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
0
Comments
 

Overcoming Resistance in Male Clients with Terry Real

 

Men in Therapy: NP0020 - Session 2

Learn how to get through to resistant male clients by avoiding the potential pitfalls of therapeutic neutrality. Renowned family therapist Terry Real, the founder of the Relational Life Institute, explores how to deal with male clients by highlighting the negative consequences of their resistance, and challenging them to change their behavior by “joining through the truth.”

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

06.26.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
6
Comments
 

Defusing Male Shame with David Wexler

 

Men in Therapy: NP0020 - Session 3

Discover why men avoid emotional confrontations because of their inherent fear of shame. David Wexler, who specializes in the treatment of relationships in conflict, describes how to develop a therapeutic relationship based on straightforward guidance and “guy talk,” rather than ambiguous “therapy-speak.”

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

06.19.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
7
Comments
 

Men and Sexuality: Challenging the Myths with Esther Perel

 

Men in Therapy: NP0020 - Session 4

Explore the poorly understood world of male sexuality by challenging some of the pervasive myths about men and their “nonrelational” attitude toward sex. Esther Perel, author of Mating in Captivity and specialist in sexuality and couples relationships, ascribes practical tools for helping men examine their own sexual blueprint.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant, to ask any questions you have of the presenter or your colleagues, or to share any experiences. As always, if you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to email support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

06.12.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
22
Comments
 

Male-Friendly Psychotherapy with Pat Love

 

Men in Therapy: NP0020--Session 1

Welcome to “Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know.” In this series, leading innovators in the field will delve into the latest research on gender differences and discuss practical ways to make therapy more inviting and helpful for male clients.

In this first session with couples and family specialist Pat Love, you’ll discover how to work with men in therapy by appealing to their logical side with fact-based, practical approaches. You’ll learn how applying brain science to gender differences can open up resistant male clients, and help opposite-sex partners better understand each other’s world.

After you hear this presentation, please take a few minutes to comment about what you found most interesting or relevant. These comment boards will be a valuable way to share your thoughts, opinions, and questions throughout the series. If you ever have any technical questions, please feel free to contact support@psychotherapynetworker.org and our Support Team will help you.

06.05.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
16
Comments
 

Men and Intimacy

 

A Relational Approach to Helping Male Clients

According to Patrick Dougherty, the biggest problem men have in psychotherapy isn’t that intimacy and the language of emotion is such foreign territory, but that therapists expect so little of them. In this clip from our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, “Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know,” Patrick explains what he means and how raising the bar for men expands the possibilities for the relational experiences they can have in our consulting rooms.



Patrick Dougherty has been in private practice for more than 30 years and has been studying Eastern philosophies and practices for the past 20 years. He teaches Qigong and is the author of Qigong in Psychotherapy: You Can Do So Much by Doing So Little and A Whole-Hearted Embrace.


Engaging Men In Therapy:
Everything Clinicians Need to Know

Starts Tuesday, June 5th

Click here for full course details.

05.30.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
0
Comments
 

Engaging Men in Therapy

 

What Clinicians Need to Know

Some time ago, my wife, Jette (who just happens to be the world’s best couples’ therapist) and I were about to begin one of the several couples weekend workshops we hold every year. As we met the assorted participants in a conference room of a local hotel, it became obvious that, as usual, it was mostly the women who had dragged their mostly unwilling male partners to the weekend. During the first break, one of the men in the group approached Jette during an early break, obviously in real distress.

“You must change the sign downstairs in the lobby,” he hissed in her ear. The offending sign, there in public for all to see, said, “Couples Therapy—Mayfair Room.” The fact that he was attending a therapy event—a word so obnoxious to him that he could barely spit it out—in his mind, clearly identified him as a total wimp, a low-testosterone failure of a man, a complete loser in the masculinity sweepstakes. God forbid somebody he knew should catch him in such humiliating circumstances—it was akin to marching publicly into a room boldly labeled, “Child Molesters Convention Here.” Male shame strikes again.

depressedman

The great secret that most men harbor is how often we feel incompetent, weak, vulnerable, and inadequate, not up to the seemingly impossible task of being a “man” (whatever that means).

And when we fail, however it looks on the outside, we experience the corrosive, toxic, intolerable feelings of shame. Just the threat of being shamed is so dreadful to us that we will go to any lengths to avoid it—we will yell at or stonewall our wives, get drunk, pick fights, drive our cars like bats out of hell, join a militia, have sex with as many women as possible—do virtually anything to avoid it.

It seems odd that after nearly 50 years of focusing on gender norms and how they affect women, the inner world of men would still remain as dimly understood as it is, even by psychotherapists. Until recently, a prime obstacle has been the ideological truism that, deep down, both genders want exactly the same thing from their relationships. But as we’ve made real advances in understanding some of the differences between the male and female brain as well as grasping the biology of other social mammals, we’ve had to take another look at some of our conventional therapeutic wisdom about commonalities between the sexes.

To explore further what some of our field’s most innovative contributors are discovering about working more effectively with men, here are two resources to check out. Just click here to preview the latest Networker streaming-video webcast series, Engaging Men in Therapy: Everything Clinicians Need to Know, beginning June 5th. And if you want some extremely thoughtful and provocative articles to challenge outdated clinical assumptions, click here to take a look at our May 2010 issue, The Secret World of Men. In either case, be prepared to discover how disconcerting—and illuminating—it is to embrace the possibility that men and women don’t necessarily want exactly the same things after all.

05.18.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Rich Simon
5
Comments
 

Defusing Male Shame

 

Understanding the Significance to Male Clients

In our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, "Men In Therapy", David Wexler discusses how the experience and perception of shame affects male clients.

This clip is a quick look at how to develop an inviting therapeutic relationship with male clients based on straightforward guidance.



David Wexler is the Executive Director of the Relationship Training Institute. He’s the author of five books, including Men in Therapy: New Approaches for Effective Treatment and When Good Men Behave Badly.


Engaging Men In Therapy:
Everything Clinicians Need to Know

Starts Tuesday, June 5th

Click here for full course details.

05.17.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
5
Comments
 

Male-Friendly Psychotherapy

 

How Brain Science Illuminates Gender Differences

Pat Love is the lead-off presenter in our upcoming streaming-video webcast series bringing together leading innovators who’ve developed practical approaches that integrate the latest research on gender differences with our evolving clinical wisdom.

This clip is a quick look at the kinds of cutting edge information with game-changing applications that can help make therapy more inviting for male clients.



Pat Love is a distinguished professor, relationship consultant, and licensed marriage and family therapist. She’s the author of Hot Monogamy and The Truth About Love and the coauthor of How to Improve Your Marriage Without Talking About It.


Engaging Men In Therapy:
Everything Clinicians Need to Know

Starts Tuesday, June 5th

Click here for full course details.

05.15.2012   Posted In: NP0020 Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know   By Psychotherapy Networker
4
Comments
 

I do blog this IDoBlog Community