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  • 0 P002 New Perspectives: Ethical Standards for the 21st Century PractitionerNew Perspectives on Ethics, Session 4 with William Doherty: Comment Board 02.14.2011 18:23
    Really and truly appreciated the technical glitches being solved -- this allowed real dialogue to unfold. Hurrah to the techies who made it happen!

    While I was very interested in the ideas presented about clinically sound termination practices, including those in sticky situations (and found Doherty's perspective compelling), I wished for more direct connection to ethics. Clinically sticky situations are different than ethically complex situations, and while they may overlap, the distinction wasn't made here. I agree that the examples of handling the clinical relationship poorly do indeed reflect mistakes, but are they ethical mistakes or clinical mistakes?

    Ruth
    Portland, OR
  • 0 P002 New Perspectives: Ethical Standards for the 21st Century PractitionerNew Perspectives on Ethics, Session 2, Ofer Zur: Comment Board 01.26.2011 18:52
    Glad to hear some of these issues addressed that aren't addressed elsewhere, including googling clients and boundaries around social networking sites. The video delay was beyond frustrating, particularly when it resulted in talking over one another (I can abide the silences) -- either a high-tech or a low-tech solution is called for.

    Ruth Gibian, LCSW
    Portland, OR
  • 0 P002 New Perspectives: Ethical Standards for the 21st Century PractitionerNew Perspectives on Ethics, Session 1: Comment Board 01.20.2011 07:47
    I appreciate the attention to how a client experiences something rather than hard and fast rules, since that's what we are charged with -- protecting the experience of safety in therapy. I also appreciate the discussion of dual relationships in communities, since there are smaller communities even in larger cities. I've wondered about the ethics of having one of our children interact with clients in a dual relationship -- e.g., not the caterer but someone like a teacher, music teacher, etc. It feels complicated to me to, say, avoid a preschool/private school/etc that would be the best fit for a child just because a client teaches there. Surely it is fraught, but very grey. If we have worked in the area for many years, it gets increasingly grey; what if the teacher was a client several years ago?

    (p.s. -- Hi Carolyn in Bellingham!)

    Ruth, Portland, OR

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