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  • 0 P001 New Perspectives on Trauma TreatmentDavid Feinstein Comment Board: New Perspectives on Trauma Treatment 11.17.2010 03:06
    See:

    Psychological Trauma in Veterans Using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A Randomized Controlled Trial (download from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf);

    Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan Genocide Survivors Using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 12(1), 41-50.

    Energy Psychology: A Review of the Preliminary Evidence. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 45, 199-213.
  • 0 P001 New Perspectives on Trauma TreatmentDavid Feinstein Comment Board: New Perspectives on Trauma Treatment 11.17.2010 03:05
    Various training programs are available. Nationally-focused programs are offered by the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology (ACEP, www.energypsych.org) and by the main EFT organization (www.EFTUniverse.com). For a solid introduction to the practice of Energy Psychology, I can recommend Promise of Energy Psychology with enthusiasm but with no pretense of objectivity. David
  • 0 P001 New Perspectives on Trauma TreatmentDavid Feinstein Comment Board: New Perspectives on Trauma Treatment 11.16.2010 15:40
    Responding to the question about the use of talking: As with EMDR, focusing on the traumatic memory or triggering cue while doing the physical intervention appears to block the stress response, allowing the hippocampus to then begin to process and integrate the experience. Little talk is required. The extended use of talking while tapping allows an entirely different level of intervention where self-concept, dysfunctional beliefs, and other cognitive aspects of the client's inner life can be efficiently addressed. -- DF
  • 0 P001 New Perspectives on Trauma TreatmentDavid Feinstein Comment Board: New Perspectives on Trauma Treatment 11.16.2010 13:17
    Responding to RozanneM: I know of only one study that directly compares tapping acupoints with needling them. 78 anxiety patients received a standard Energy Psychology protocol with half randomly assigned to the stimulation of the acupoints using needles and the other half using tapping. The tapping group did better, with 78% showing improvement while only 50% in the needling group showed improvement. The study was conducted in Argentina by Joaquin Andrade, a physician who is also well-trained in acupuncture. It is reported in a book but was never submitted to a peer-reviewed journal. The finding does not surprise me because the tapping allows the clinician more moment-to-moment flexibility in tracking and adjusting to what is occurring in the client. A number of studies also show acupressure and acupuncture to both be effective for a variety of psychological conditions. These are summarized in http://mechanisms.EnergyPsychEd.org. David Feinstein

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