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Panicking On Purpose

 

Reid Wilson advocates intentionally triggering panic, in order to master it.

An hour-long visit to an island of calm—that’s what many clients who panic hope for when they go to a therapist.


But according to Reid Wilson, an expert on panic and other anxiety disorders, that’s the least beneficial thing we can provide. In fact, the safety of the consulting room makes it the ideal place for clients to intentionally trigger their panic. Then, with our support, they can move into the experience and master it.


In a recent conversation—part of our upcoming webcast series on the latest advances in treating anxiety—Reid illustrates the use of practical strategies for gradual exposure through which the client always comes out on top.


In this brief video clip, Reid explains how he prepares clients to “take the hit” that will allow him or her to step out of the victim position and onto the road to healing. Take just a few minutes to watch. I think you’ll find plenty you can use right away in your own work with clients who are anxious or given to panic attacks.




Reid Wilson is just one of the six innovators included in our upcoming video webcast series: Treating Anxiety: The Latest Advances. It offers a vivid look at the practical methods experts on anxiety treatment like Danie Beaulieu, Peg Wehrenberg, Steve Andreas, Lynn Lyons and David Burns have to offer that can expand your own clinical repertoire with psychotherapy’s most common presenting problem. To learn more about this exciting new webcast, click here.


Want to learn more about treating anxiety and panic? Here are 3 Free articles that are popular with your peers: "Facing Our Worst Fears: Finding the Courage to Stay in the Moment" by Reid Wilson, "The Ten Best-Ever Anxiety Management Techniques" by Margaret Wehrenberg, and "Nightmind: Making Darkness Our Friend Again" by Ruben Naiman.


Explore More in our FREE Popular Topic Library. You'll find lots of free articles on Anxiety, Depression, and Brain Science.


Need CEs? Audio Courses available include The Anxious Brain and Ten Best-Ever Anxiety Management Techniques, both by Margaret Wehrenberg.


About Reid Wilson: Reid is associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. He runs www.anxieties.com, the largest, free anxiety self-help site on the Internet. He’s the author of Don’t Panic: Taking Control of Anxiety Attacks and Facing Panic: Self-Help for People with Panic Attacks.

09.12.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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Who Needs an Ethics Code?

 

Some people---especially those who’ve never been in therapy---insist that the therapist is nothing more than a kind of paid friend. After all, isn’t therapy just a regularly scheduled conversation in which Party A listens sympathetically, making encouraging or consoling little noises, while Party B feels free to share the most intimate details of her life? But of course it’s a rare friendship that could tolerate such open-ended, one-sided “sharing” of our most private concerns, not to mention our uncensored thoughts and feelings.


In fact, the hallmark of the therapeutic encounter is that the therapist is an expert, trained in a particular skill-set to conduct a rather odd, rarified conversation, while the client most definitely is not. Although both therapist and client enter equally and freely into an association, it’s understood that for the duration of treatment, the relationship---however “collaborative”---will also be hierarchical: the therapist will be the guide, leader, advisor, teacher, whatever, e.g., the one in charge. In effect, the client agrees, however grudgingly and fitfully, to at least attempt to unilaterally disarm and expose his vulnerability, neediness, flaws, and failings to someone who’s in no sense obliged or expected to reciprocate.


What keeps this arrangement from being hugely dangerous for the client---what makes it even possible, let alone healing---isn’t just the therapist’s skill, but the nature of the ethical contract underlying the therapeutic relationship itself. It’s precisely the client’s deep-seated knowledge that this relationship is defined and bound all around by firm ethical rules of conduct that frees him from the ordinary internal and social strictures that often make emotional healing impossible.


We may like to think that as good-hearted, moral, upright, caring people, we don’t really need formal codes of ethics. After all, we aren’t going to rob our clients, sleep with them, gossip about them, manipulate them for our own advantage. In fact, we’d never hurt anybody . . . intentionally. But there’s the rub. Nowadays, personal and social boundaries have become so loose and blurry that it’s possible to transgress them without even realizing it. In the salad days of psychoanalysis, professional ethics---particularly those having to do with boundaries, dual relationships, confidentiality, and so forth---were largely in synch with the times. Even up into the 1960s and ’70s, we lived in a relatively buttoned-up culture in which clear demarcations between the personal, the social, and the professional were the norm. Today, all those old notions have pretty much gone out the window.


The seductive informality of our times has transformed even our most basic ideas of when our “office” hours end and where therapy takes place. A few months ago, attending a psychotherapy conference held at a seaside resort town, I was hanging out by the pool with an old therapist buddy who refused a second glass of wine because he said he had to get on the phone for a therapy session. Indeed, therapy now takes place regularly via Skype, cell phone, e-mail, and even in little therapy smidgens via texting. Do I hear the sound of Freud & Co. collectively rolling over in their graves?


In the rebroadcast of our acclaimed webcast, Handling Today’s Hidden Ethical Dilemmas, starting September 17, six of our field’s clearest thinkers demonstrate that formal codes of ethics are far more than an antiquated set of rules, periodically reviewed in mind-numbing CE trainings so we can meet our licensing requirements. Instead, they are what makes psychotherapy as we know it possible. In fact, it might be said that whenever we conduct a therapy session, whether in person, on the phone, or in cyberspace, those rules are always implicitly present---our tacit ally and cotherapist---insuring that whatever therapeutic space is being created is truly a safe haven in a world in which circles of emotional safety and protection are in exceedingly short supply.


Want to know more about Ethics? Check out these two free articles from the July/August 2012 issue, "Ethics Today and Yesterday" by Mary Jo Barrett and "Therapist Self-Disclosure" by Janine Roberts.


Looking for quick CEs? Take the online magazine quiz, "Ethics In The Digital Age".

09.07.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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The Neurobiology of a Panic Attack

 

Integrating Brain Science into Anxiety Treatment

In recent years, our rapidly expanding understanding of the neurobiology of anxiety has become much more than an arcane scientific disciple filled with polysyllabic terms. Therapists like Margaret Wehrenberg, who have studied closely what this new research reveals, have discovered that brain science now offers a range of practical tools that can make work with anxious clients much more efficient and effective.


In a recent conversation—part of our upcoming webcast series on the latest advances in treating anxiety—Margaret offered both an eye-opening look at the neuroanatomy of a panic attack and a highly practical discussion of how that can lead to more effective clinical interventions.


In this brief video clip, Margaret shows how she begins work with new clients—learning about their current strategies for dealing with anxiety, providing education about the neurobiology underlying their emotional state, and beginning to structure treatment.


Just in the few minutes of the interview, you’ll find plenty that you apply directly in your own work with anxious clients.



Margaret Werenberg is just one of the six innovators included in our upcoming video webcast series: Treating Anxiety: The Latest Advances. It offers a vivid look at the practical methods experts on anxiety treatment like Reid Wilson, Danie Beaulieu, Steve Andreas, Lynn Lyons and David Burns have to offer that can expand your own clinical repertoire with psychotherapy’s most common presenting problem. To learn more about this exciting new webcast, click here.


Want to learn more about treating anxiety and panic? Here are 3 Free articles that are popular with your peers: "The Ten Best-Ever Anxiety Management Techniques", by Margaret Wehrenberg, "Confronting the New Anxiety: How Therapists Can Help Today’s Fearful Kids" by Ron Taffel, and "The Anxious Client Reconsidered: Getting Beyond Symptoms to Deeper Change" by Graham Campbell.


Explore More in our FREE Popular Topic Library. You'll find lots of free articles on Anxiety, Depression, and Brain Science.


Need CEs? Audio Courses available include The Anxious Brain and Ten Best-Ever Anxiety Management Techniques, both by Margaret Wehrenberg.


About Margaret Wehrenberg: Specializing in anxiety treatment, Margaret uses a holistic approach for symptom management. She’s the author of The 10 Best-Ever Anxiety Management Techniques and, most recently, The 10 Best-Ever Depression Management Techniques.

08.31.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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Treating Anxiety: The Key is Motivation

 

David Burns on the Paradox of Resistance

According to renowned expert on anxiety David Burns, far and away the biggest barrier to treating it successfully-- sometimes even in a single session-- is recognizing how many clients covertly hold onto their symptoms, even when they restrict their lives and seem to cause them enormous distress.


That's because, deep down, they believe that their anxiety protects them more than it disrupts their lives. Add to that the fact that so much anxiety treatment involves some form of exposure to the very thing that causes them so much discomfort, clients have pretty compelling reasons to resist the onerous process of transforming their anxiety. That’s why the drop-out rates for anxiety treatment are so high.


Recently David has discovered that through a method that directly addresses the perceived perils of change in the very first session of therapy, he was able to forge an entirely different kind of collaborative alliance with client from the get-go. He began to see results beyond anything he had previously achieved in his long and distinguished career. The key was not starting the process of treatment before the client was truly ready to begin.


In this clip, David tells the memorable tale of a case that pivoted dramatically on what he calls this “paradoxical agenda-setting.”



David is just one of the six innovators included in our upcoming video webcast series on Treating Anxiety: The Latest Advances. It offers a vivid look at the practical methods experts on anxiety treatment like Reid Wilson, Danie Beaulieu, Steve Andreas, Lynn Lyons and Margaret Wehrenberg have to offer that can expand your own clinical repertoire with psychotherapy’s most common presenting problem. To learn more about this exciting new webcast, click here.


To learn more about the latest developments in understanding anxiety, its roots in our neurophysiology and practical methods for effective treatment, check out these free articles:


"10 Best Ever Anxiety Management Techniques" by Margaret Wehrenberg and "The Language of the Nervous System" by Laurie Leitch and Elaine Miller-Karas.

08.29.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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Anxiety: Our Paradoxical Companion

 

If we revisit our earliest memories, it’s there: maybe a vague agitation in the absence of any immediate awareness of what the big deal was or perhaps a mysteriously heart-thumping reaction to some scary fantasy unanchored in everyday reality. While fear is our hair trigger response to the threats right in front of our nose, anxiety is our early-warning system-- evolution’s way of helping us navigate a complex environment whose perils aren’t always obvious and close-at-hand. We learn early in life that, while fear is typically concrete and literal, anxiety is often a construct of the imagination, albeit one that rarely brings much creative satisfaction.

Anxiety

From as far back as most of us can remember, anxiety is one of our most intimate companions. And if we are temperamentally wired for vigilance and reactivity, it can become constant company, even when an outside observer might think we should be carefree. One of life’s early discoveries is that, even when we’re telling ourselves there’s nothing to worry about, it’s hard to "just say no" to anxiety- there’s no obvious off-switch to that familiar roiling tumult that can so suddenly hijack our nervous system, however frantically we may search for one. In fact, that quest for a magical off-switch, more than any other human yearning, may be the primary reason that people seek out psychotherapists.

For most of us, our relationship with anxiety is clouded by a fundamental confusion. Evolution appears to have appointed anxiety to be our Guardian, a personal security system dedicated to keeping us out of harm’s way, sometimes even in the absence of any real danger. The biological power and persistence of anxiety lies in this fundamentally benign function—at its root, whatever its tendency to send us false positives about the presence of danger, its intent is to keep us safe. But so much of the time, we experience our anxiety as a relentless Tormentor, a source of unnecessary suffering that we desperately try to ignore, avoid, wish away or, failing that, carpet bomb with medication. The failure of these customary remedies for anxiety has made it the leading presenting problem in therapists’ caseloads around the world.

So what’s the state of our knowledge about how to help the world’s anxiety sufferers? In the Networker’s upcoming video webcast series, Treating Anxiety: Latest Advances beginning September 18th, some of the field’s foremost clinical innovators—David Burns, Margaret Wehrenberg, Danie Beaulieu, Steve Andreas, Lynn Lyons, and Reid Wilson—will demonstrate the discoveries they’ve made about shifting our relationship with anxiety and disentangling the paradoxical roles it too often plays in our lives. We hope you’ll take advantage of this opportunity to acquire some powerful tools you’ll be able to put to use in your practice--and, perhaps, your life—right away.

Want to now more about Anxiety? Check out these two free articles, "Brain to Brain: The Talking Cure Goes Beyond Words" by Janina Fisher and "Grand Illusion: Has the American Dream Become Our Nightmare?" by Mary Sykes Wylie from Psychotherapy Networker Magazine.

There are more free Anxiety resources in our Popular Topic Library--articles including "The Ten Best-Ever Anxiety Management Techniques" by Margaret Wehrenberg, "The Anxious Client Reconsidered: Getting Beyond Symptoms to Deeper Change" by Graham Campbell, and "Facing Our Worst Fears: Finding the Courage to Stay in the Moment" by Reid Wilson.

 

Interested in the roles of temperament and attachement in Anxiety issues? Check out the March/April 2011 issue, "The Great Attachment Debate".


Looking for quick CEs? Take our reading course, "Treating The Anxious Client".

 

08.24.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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    Getting Past Trauma

     

    Diana Fosha On Bring Out Clients' Dormant Resilience

    As therapists, we all know that you can have a seemingly safe, trusting bond with a traumatized client and still not have it translate into real changes in that person's life.

     

    In a recent interview with Rich Simon, Diana Fosha, originator of Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP), shows us how to move to a different level of connection with clients that can make a difference outside the consulting room.

     

    It’s all about being in the relational moment.

     

    In this clip she explains how attending to what she calls "micro-tracking"--picking up on small changes in expression and affect--can add enormous power to work with people who've been traumatized.

    Diana is one of six innovators interviewed in our webcast series starting August 23rd, the Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment, in which she vividly demonstrates how to move beyond a focus on trauma to bring out a client's dormant resilience.


     

     


    Free interview with Diana Fosha: Read an interview between Diana Fosha and Psychotherapy Networker magazine author Ryan Howes in “Point of View: The Alphabet Soup”.

     

    Free Resources on trauma: Check out these two free articles from Psychotherapy Networker Magazine: “Applying The Brakes In Trauma Treatment, Safety is Essential” by Babette Rothschild and “The End of Innocence: Reconsidering Our Concepts of Victimhood” by Dusty Miller.

     

    Free Resources on attachment: Check out The Great Attachment Debate, a popular issue of Psychotherapy Networker Magazine, available to read for free online.

     

    Explore more Diana Fosha in Audio Courses available The Challenge of Engagement: A Moment-to-Moment Approach to Experiential Therapy and Accessing the Higher Self: From Suffering to Flourishing.

     

    About Diana Fosha: Diana is the developer of Accelerated Experiential-Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP) and director of the AEDP Institute. She’s the author of The Transforming Power of Affect: A Model for Accelerated Change and a coeditor of The Healing Power of Emotion: Affective Neuroscience, Development, and Clinical Practice.


    08.17.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      Teenage Problems, Traumatic Childhoods and the Work of the Therapist in the Juvenile Justice System

       

      Ken Hardy Talks about Creating Safety and Connecting with Teens in Trouble

      Ken Hardy calls us to expand how we think about the connection among trauma, race, poverty and marginalization. In this recent conversation with Rich Simon, he shows us how he puts these ideas to work in ways that you’ll find surprising, powerful, and, at times, very moving.


      Ken illustrates how to translate broad ideas about the sociocultural context into interventions that shift the therapeutic process in ways that open up new possibilities for connection. Watch the clip below to see how he looks for what’s heroic and resourceful in the story of a tough young black man who others might find “resistant,” even menacing.


      Ken is part of our webcast series, The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment, that re-launches on August 23rd. His interview demonstrates how to work with the most reluctant of therapy clients with respect, authenticity and a passionate belief in the possibility of healing.



      Free Resources on trauma and treatment for teenagers in trouble: Check out these two free articles co-authored by Ken Hardy from Psychotherapy Networker Magazine: “Creating a Zone of Safety and Connection for Angry Black Teens” and “When ‘Them’ Become ‘Us.’”


      Explore more in the Free Popular Topic Library where you’ll find 12 popular articles on Adolescents and Trauma including “The Logic of Self Injury: A Teen Symptom of Our Time” by Martha Straus and “Mission Possible: The Art of Engaging Tough Teens” by Matthew Selekman. Audio Courses available include Helping Adolescent Girls in Crisis by Martha Straus and Breaking Through to Teens by Ron Taffel.


      About Ken Hardy: Ken is the director of the Eikenberg Institute for Relationships and professor of family therapy at Drexel University. He’s co-authored two books— Teens Who Hurt: Clinical Interventions to Break the Cycle of Adolescent Violence and Revisioning Family Therapy: Race, Culture, and Gender in Clinical Practice.

      08.15.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      Reshaping the Trauma Narrative

       

      In his upcoming session of our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, “The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment: New Perspectives on PTSD,” Don Meichenbaum explains how to help clients find the more positive “untold” story behind the trauma they experienced.


      In this clip, Meichenbaum demonstrates the first step to effective trauma work: forming a therapeutic alliance with the client through the use of “what” and “how” questions distributed over the course of the session. Watch the clip to hear examples of such questions, and learn why they are so effective.



      Don Meichenbaum, Ph.D., a founder of Cognitive Behavioral Modification, was voted one of the 10 most influential psychotherapists of the century in a survey reported in the American Psychologist. An expert in the treatment of PTSD, he’s the author of A Clinical Handbook/Practical Therapist Manual of Assessing and Treating Adults with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.


      The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment
      New Perspectives on PTSD

      Starts Thursday, August 23rd

      Click here for full course details.

      08.03.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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      The Wounds That Time Won’t Heal: Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment

       

      When I first began studying psychotherapy in the early 1970s, for all practical purposes the field had never heard of trauma. Back then, the prevalence and destructive impact of child abuse and domestic violence were virtually unknown, and nobody realized how much terrible events and extreme suffering could profoundly impair our very neurobiology. At that time almost the entire focus of psychotherapy was on the family melodramas involving middle class parents and their basically safe and privileged children. This was territory I knew very well—I had experienced enough of my own family’s emotional theatrics to keep several therapists duly employed over the years.


      But the “discovery” of trauma—particularly the identification and naming of PTSD—introduced me and our entire field to another world entirely. I began to realize the vast chasm between the rather “small-u” unhappiness I had experienced in my relatively sheltered life and the unrelenting pervasive misery of people who had experienced the worst that can befall human beings. The lives of these people had been profoundly altered. For them, time—even with psychotherapy—did not heal all wounds. Unlike the fractious, stressful circumstances of my own childhood, traumatic memories often couldn’t be talked into submission through ordinary therapy. These clients showed symptoms—flashbacks, suicide attempts, nightmares, paralyzing anxiety, dissociation, substance abuse—that were much more complicated and intractable than anything most therapists were prepared to deal with.


      This was all far from experience. And yet, on one occasion I came horribly close to viscerally understanding what psychic trauma really felt like. Driving home one dark, wet night on a slippery road, not paying enough attention to what I was doing, I turned onto another road and a car I hadn’t seen was forced to swerve to avoid me. For what seemed like a lifetime, I watched helplessly as the driver braked with a great squeal of ties. As a burst of sparks rose up from its undercarriage, the car jackknifed across the road and hurled directly toward a concrete wall, stopping just inches short of it. Thank God the couple in the car were not hurt, but they were too shocked even to reply to my stammered apologies. Afterward, I lay awake night after night, replaying the event over and over and over again, imagining a far worse outcome.


      After some months, I did recover, but I can still feel a twinge in my gut when I think of that night. For many people who experience full-fledged, severe, and/or chronic trauma, however, there is no recovery, no safe comfort zone to which they can retreat, no ability to control what goes on in their own bodies and minds. This is why I have a certain kind of awe for people who make treating traumatized clients their specialty. They really do seem like a breed apart, even from the rest of the therapy world.


      Which brings me to our upcoming webcast series, The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment, which features video interviews with half a dozen of the world’s most knowledgeable and adept practitioners of trauma therapy. Listening to them describe in vivid detail, with fascinating stories and examples, exactly how they go about practicing their particular approach—we not only get a sense of different ways of looking at trauma, but see a fascinating variety of clinical talent and creativity in action.


      We get a visceral sense from Chris Courtois, for example, of the often eerie experience of working with a person with dissociative identity disorder. Somatic therapist Pat Ogden offers a close-up glimpse of the non-verbal, healing choreography of her approach. Don Meichenbaum plays a kind of therapeutic Columbo using disarmingly crafted questions to help clients realize not how traumatized they are, but rather the hidden stories of inner strength and resilience that have allowed them to move on in their lives. Diana Fosha shows how skillfully she uses herself to break the profound sense of loneliness and isolation that characterizes many trauma clients. Widening the clinical implications of social context factors, Ken Hardy describes his work with clients marginalized by poverty and racism. Mary Jo Barrett identifies five simple but highly critical ingredients in effective trauma treatment. Finally, Francine Shapiro gives us a nuts and bolts lesson about how to use EMDR to treat trauma clients.

      So I hope you’ll join us for what I think are a series of candid, inspiring conversations with practitioners who embody the very highest ideals of our profession, but who also have so much to offer in mastering the craft of responding to some of the most profound challenges we face as healing professionals.


      The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment:
      New Perspectives on PTSD

      Starts Thursday, August 23rd

      Click here for full course details.

      07.27.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        The 5 Essential Ingredients of Effective Trauma Treatment

         

        Exploring the Do’s and Don’ts of Trauma Work

        Mary Jo Barrett, as part of our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, “The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment: New Perspectives on PTSD,” explores the most important fundamentals in working with trauma clients. In her presentation, she’ll outline how to effectively structure a collaborative approach to treatment.


        In this clip, Barrett discusses how she uses the natural cycle of growth as a metaphor for traumatized clients, thus helping the clients to acknowledge those cycles and expand to new realities.



        Mary Jo Barrett, M.S.W., the founder and director of the Center for Contextual Change, teaches at the University of Chicago. She’s the coauthor of Systemic Treatment of Incest and coeditor of Treating Incest: A Multimodal Systems Perspective.


        The Latest Advances in Trauma Treatment:
        New Perspectives on PTSD

        Starts Thursday, August 23rd

        Click here for full course details.

        07.24.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        Why We Cry

         

        And How Understanding Our Nervous Systems Can Help

        Why do we cry? And what’s the basic definition of emotion, anyway?


        Learn from professor of psychology Jay Efran about his two-stage theory on why we cry and how to more effectively handle those situations in which our clients burst into tears in session. Based on his article in the May/June 2012 issue with Mitchell Greene, “Why We Cry: A Clinician’s Guide,” this clip will illustrate the thesis of their theory and provide a real-life, practical example.



        Jay’s presentation is part of our new streaming-video webcast series, “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room.”


        Jay Efran, Ph.D., is emeritus professor of psychology at Temple University. He’s the coauthor of Language, Structure, and Change: Frameworks of Meaning in Psychotherapy and The Tao of Sobriety.


        The Emotion Revolution:
        Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

        Starts Wednesday, July 25th

        Click here for full course details.

        07.17.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        Helping Clients with Anger Problems

         

        How to Create a Brain-Change Plan with Angry Clients

        How can you help angry clients calm themselves—and maintain your own equilibrium—both in and out of therapy?


        Clinical psychologist Ron Potter-Efron says that understanding the principles of neuroplasticity can help both you and your clients better deal with anger and reactivity. Check out this clip to discover how knowing about brain function can help your clients who have anger issues.



        Ron Potter-Efron, Ph.D., a clinical psychotherapist, is co-owner of First Things First Counseling and Consulting and director of its Anger Management Center. He’s the author of Shame, Guilt, and Alcoholism, Angry All the Time, and Healing the Angry Brain.


        What are some techniques you use in therapy when clients get angry, or when you find yourself becoming angry? Let us know.


        The Emotion Revolution:
        Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

        Starts Wednesday, July 25th

        Click here for full course details.

        07.12.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        Treating the Mixed-Agenda Couple

         

        What Should You Do When Partners Have Contradictory Goals

        What should you do when one partner in a couple is serious about divorce while the other hopes to save the marriage?


        In this clip from our upcoming streaming-video webcast series “Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?” family therapist William Doherty discusses the problems that arise in couples therapy when one partner is leaning in and the other is leaning away from the marriage. Listen to the clip below to find out what he thinks you can do if you find yourself in this challenging situation.


        William Doherty, Ph.D., is a professor and director of the Citizen Professional Center at the University of Minnesota. He’s the author or coauthor of 12 books on families and family therapy, including Take Back Your Marriage, Take Back Your Kids, and Family Therapy, with Susan McDaniel.


        Want to hear more on this topic? Bill Doherty also wrote an article that explores this topic in our popular November/December 2011 issue, which you can read here.


        Have you ever found yourself in this situation with a couple? How did you handle it? Let us know.


        Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?
        Starts Tuesday, July 17th

        Click here for full course details.

        07.10.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        The Brain’s Negativity Bias: Taking in the Good

         

        The Role of Evolution in our Emotions

        Rick Hanson, the best-selling author of Buddha’s Brain, sets the stage for the need to counteract our brain’s inborn, evolutionary tendency to interpret negative experiences as threats to survival. Instead, he offers concrete methods for helping people translate positive experiences—both inside and outside the consulting room—into enduring internal resources that are at the core of therapeutic healing.



        Rick is one of several noted clinicians in our upcoming streaming-video series “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body, and Soul in the Consulting Room” who demonstrate innovative methods for utilizing clients’ direct emotional experience to greatly enhance the effectiveness of psychotherapy.


        To read more about how therapists can work directly work emotion in session, take a look at our May/June 2012 issue here.


        Rick Hanson, Ph.D., is a neuropsychologist with an interest in the intersection of psychology, neurology, and Buddhism, and an invited presenter at Oxford, Stanford, and the University of California at Berkeley. He’s the author of 15 books, including Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom.


        The Emotion Revolution:
        Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

        Starts Wednesday, July 25th

        Click here for full course details.

        07.05.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        Angry Women, Withdrawn Men

         

        Breaking Through in Couples Therapy

        If you’ve ever worked with a couple, you know the palpable tension of a first session. There’s the fed-up wife and the husband who’s reluctantly agreed to come to therapy.

        In the clip below, Jette Simon, a Senior Clinical Instructor in Imago Therapy, offers a step-by-step account of how she goes about creating a safe therapeutic space for both partners—despite their history and conflicts—and begins to engage them in a process of change.



        To read more about the challenging work of couples therapy and how we can become more prepared to work with couples in session, see our November/December 2011 issue on couples therapy here.


        Jette Simon, Lic., who conducts basic and advanced training programs in Imago Relationship Therapy, is the director of the Washington, D.C. Institute for Couples Therapy, and is a Senior Clinical Instructor for Imago International. She’s the author of Imago: The Therapy of Love.


        Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?
        Starts Tuesday, July 17th

        Click here for full course details.

        07.03.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        No Emotion Allowed Here—Therapist at Work!

         

        The Emotional Revolution

        As therapists, probably most of us know only too well the queasy, anxious feeling we had as young practitioners (maybe even still have) when faced with a highly emotional client, perhaps sobbing uncontrollably in the chair across from us. Trained to believe that our job is to help that person feel better, we want to do something or say something that will provide comfort and ease that pain. But all too often, there’s been almost nothing in our academic education and survey of clinical theories to help us feel at home with our clients’ emotions, much less our own. 

        And what about sitting face Emotional clientto face in a room with someone in a state of transferential rage—yelling, pounding the chair, blaming us for his/her problem? And couples! No wonder so many couples therapists favor coaching clients in highly cognitive skills-building and problem-solving techniques. In one interview of our upcoming webcast series on emotion, Sue Johnson remembers many years ago watching a therapist basically scold couples who seemed to be getting too upset, even sending one partner out of the room to calm down. The title of that session must surely have been, “No emotion here, please—therapist at work!”

        This fear of out-of-control emotions, even among therapists who are supposed to be comfortable with “strong affect,” as we hygienically call it, reflects an old Cartesian prejudice in Western society against the “lower,” messier emotions—primitive, animal-like passions rooted in the body. For many hundreds of years, we’ve preferred the more respectable, “higher” faculties of logic and reason, products of the thinking, rational mind. From the very beginning, psychotherapy models, of whatever stripe, have shared this cultural bias. Rather than welcome emotions into the consulting room, they’ve tended to regard excessive expressions of emotion as symptoms of something awry in the psyche. The clinical goal has often been to get all that raw stuff under control. Freud’s directive—“Where id was, there shall ego be”—has been the implicit watchword for one hundred years of psychotherapy practice.

        But, lo and behold, over the past two or three decades—even just in the last 10 years—we’ve been witness to nothing less than a revolution in our knowledge and understanding of emotion. Neuroscience research, for example, has demonstrated beyond all doubt that emotion is itself the driving force of much of our mental life, including our precious reasoning faculties. “We’re not necessarily thinking machines,” says renowned neuroscientist Antonio Damasio, “but feeling machines that think.” Without the literally moving force of affect—e-motion —we’re like high-IQ slugs in a sense, not likely to go anywhere or do much of anything except munch on whatever nutrients fall in our path. Without emotion, we’d be like disabled computers, with no desire, love, sadness, fear, need, impatience, anger, frustration, enthusiasm—those experiential states that literally turn us on, make us go. Without emotion, the wiring may be in place, but the power has been disconnected.

        Luckily, therapists are also beginning to catch up to the neuroscience in their growing recognition that working sensitively and skillfully with clients’ emotions is critical to clinical success. In our new Networker webcast series beginning July 18th, “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room,” I talk with 6 therapeutic innovators—Susan Johnson, Rick Hanson, Joan Klagsbrun, Jay Efran, Ron Potter-Efron, and Diana Fosha—about the latest developments in helping clients experience emotion as a coherent, vital, enlivening force in their relational lives.

        But even more than that, this group of noted contributors to our field show us the importance of how navigating through the ebb and flow of emotion is at the heart of our therapeutic craft. As Damasio has written, “Most of what we construct as wisdom over time is the result of cultivating the knowledge about how our emotions behave and what we learn from them.” I hope you can join us as we explore that state of our current clinical wisdom about the role of emotion in effective psychotherapy.

        Want to read more on emotion in the consulting room? Take a look at the May/June 2012 issue here to peruse articles from some of the field’s visionaries, including Susan Johnson.

        The Emotion Revolution:
        Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

        Starts Wednesday, July 25th

        Click here for full course details.

        06.29.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Rich Simon
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        The Healing Power of Emotion

         

        Harnessing the Strength of Emotion with Susan Johnson

        No one has been more instrumental in bringing “The Emotional Revolution” into the consulting room than master clinician Susan Johnson. In the video clip below, Sue describes her time as a grad student when the direct experience of emotion was seen as a disruptive force in the consulting room rather than a potential source of deep healing and connection.



        Read Susan Johnson’s recent article on this topic FREE. It’s the cover feature article in the May/June issue of the Networker, “The Power of Emotion in Therapy.”


        Susan Johnson, Ed.D., professor of clinical psychology, is one of the developers of Emotionally Focused Therapy. She’s the director of the Ottawa Couple and Family Institute and the International Center for Excellence in EFT. Her latest book is Hold Me Tight: Seven Conversations for a Lifetime of Love.


        Learn more about Sue’s presentation and all the other conversations that are part of our new upcoming streaming-video webcast series:


        The Emotion Revolution:
        Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

        Starts Wednesday, July 25th

        Click here for full course details.

        06.29.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
        0
        Comments
         

        Motivating the Reluctant Male Client

         

        Achieving Leverage with Resistant Men

        Every couples therapist knows that men are often dragged kicking and screaming into therapy by their partners. But how do you work with a client who doesn’t want to be there in the first place?


        In the clip below, Terry Real, the founder of the Relational Life Institute, explains how he achieves “leverage” with reluctant male clients and how that fits with his idea about the typical dynamics of troubled couples. If you’ve never heard Terry present on his innovative approach that challenges many of the conventions of traditional couples work, you have a treat in store for you. Just click here or on the video below:



        To get more information about the complete Networker webcast series, “Men in Therapy: What Clinicians Need to Know,”, including interviews with Esther Perel, David Wexler, Pat Love and Terry, among others, just click here.

        Engaging Men In Therapy:
        Everything Clinicians Need to Know

        Starts Tuesday, June 5th

        Click here for full course details.

        06.28.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
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        The Dance of Intimacy

         

        The Art of Nonverbal Connection

        To make intimacy come alive in a troubled relationship, a therapist must know how to help couples connect nonverbally.


        See how noted couples therapist Hedy Schleifer uses touch, gaze, and other nonverbal cues in her work in this clip from our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, “Who’s Afraid of Couples Therapy?”



        Hedy Schleifer, M.A., L.M.H.C., is an internationally known couples therapist, workshop presenter, and clinical trainer. She’s pioneered the training of Imago Relationship therapists internationally. She’s the founder of the Tikkun Learning Center, an educational institution through which she trains therapists in Encounter-Centered Couples Therapy..


        Who's Afraid of Couples Therapy?
        Starts Tuesday, July 17th

        Click here for full course details.

        06.26.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
        0
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          How to Help Clients Cope With Overwhelming Emotion

           

          The Focusing Method with Joan Klagsbrun

          Helping clients deal with overwhelming emotion can be a challenge. Explore the effectiveness of using the Focusing method and encouraging clients to befriend their inner experience in this clip from our upcoming streaming-video webcast series, “The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind, Body and Soul in the Consulting Room.”


          In this excerpt, Joan Klagsbrun discusses three techniques therapists can use to enable their clients to develop the right relationship with their inner experience and appropriately deal with feelings of intense emotion.



          Joan Klagsbrun, Ph.D., a psychologist in private practice in the Boston area and an adjunct faculty member at Lesley University, has been teaching Focusing internationally for more than 30 years.


          The Emotion Revolution: Harnessing Mind
          Body and Soul in the Consulting Room

          Starts Wednesday, July 25th

          Click here for full course details.

          06.22.2012   Posted In: NETWORKER EXCHANGE   By Psychotherapy Networker
          4
          Comments
             
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